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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    17

    Ac Checks in March

    My company has decided to purchases condenser blankets to cover the condenser to bring up pressure's so we can perform the checks with the ambient temp in the 50's. I have never tried this so I would like to hear from techs who have used this method, as in any problems or success's they may have had in using them, Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,717
    you can do it although its best not to try and charge the unit and if its looks low charge on refrigerant just flag it for return trip when it warms up.if its a heat pump check it in heat mode
    We really need change now

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    229
    So my company isnt the only one lol. At least your company is providing blankets. We wait until its 65-70 and then cover the unit with cardboard.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    884
    It's not a perfect way to do things, it will prevent callbacks for no cool. It may not nail the charge but it will get it close. Most companies are trying to provide a service and keep the customers cool while making a profit. Instead of coming back later on and adjusting things, you'll be able to be productive. My branch pays $1.15 per mile to the main office for vehicle use. Excessive mileage and labor affects profitability. Eliminate those extra trips and make yourself worth more by lowering overhead and using labor more efficiently.

    BTW, a drop cloth or coat bungeed across the top will get you to the same place, a head pressure within normal AC operating temps.
    I am for doing good to the poor, but...I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. I observed...that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.
    ― Benjamin Franklin

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    152
    Quote Originally Posted by allan38 View Post
    BTW, a drop cloth or coat bungeed across the top will get you to the same place, a head pressure within normal AC operating temps.
    A easy trick I use...half a piece of insulated sheet metal on top of the condenser, and I set my tool bag on top to hold it down. Not optimal, but it does the job.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    California
    Posts
    91
    Garbage can lid with my drill on it =/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Cincinnati ohio
    Posts
    252
    We've started ac tune ups. Gotta love washing condensers when there is snow on the ground. I have a small tarp I either wrap or put on top with my bag to hold it down. IM READY FOR SPRING!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    2,942
    What a bunch of BS!

    Do you have data to back up what you are "simulating"? When ya throw a tarp over the od unit...what temp are you "simulating" for the OD temp????

    Yeah, the manufacturer's should have another column in the charging charts....Tarp,Sheetmetal, pull the condensor motor wire....

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    94
    I shoot for 105 degree saturation temp on the high side, which is a fairly standard rating point. That is about 210 psi for R22, 330psi for R410a, etc. I then look for 5-20 degree superheat on the low side. It also helps to have it warm in the house, which can be hard to do. If it is below 72 degrees in there when I arrive I turn the heat up while I check all the inside stuff. It helps some. This will give you a pretty good idea of how the system is working. At least no major problems will get by you.
    I use a plastic drop cloth and a couple of 1" x 2" magnets to hold it in place.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,314
    Quote Originally Posted by tchntch View Post
    I shoot for 105 degree saturation temp on the high side, which is a fairly standard rating point. That is about 210 psi for R22, 330psi for R410a, etc. I then look for 5-20 degree superheat on the low side. It also helps to have it warm in the house, which can be hard to do. If it is below 72 degrees in there when I arrive I turn the heat up while I check all the inside stuff. It helps some. This will give you a pretty good idea of how the system is working. At least no major problems will get by you.
    I use a plastic drop cloth and a couple of 1" x 2" magnets to hold it in place.
    On a 10 SEER unit, your 105 high side sat may be simulating an 85 degree day, while on a 13 SEER system it may be simulating a 95 degree day. Do you allow for that also. on piston/fixed metering device systems, are you also checking your indoor wetbulb temp to find out what Sh you should have for the outdoor conditions you are trying to simulate.
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    nampa idaho
    Posts
    66
    The fieldpiece jacket works great, I've calculated lineset lengths and calculated charge, then put the jacket on a few times and weigh the charge in with gauges and it has always come out the same as going by lineset length and charging accordingly

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    270
    Quote Originally Posted by beshvac View Post
    What a bunch of BS!

    Do you have data to back up what you are "simulating"? When ya throw a tarp over the od unit...what temp are you "simulating" for the OD temp????

    Yeah, the manufacturer's should have another column in the charging charts....Tarp,Sheetmetal, pull the condensor motor wire....
    Agreed, wevstart clean and checks in late april. We will not hook up gauges on any of these systems. You will inspect electrical, clean coils, make sure no air is going around coil, and change air filters. Low voltage wiring is the biggest culprit of early no ac's. Rule everything out but low charge issues, and go back when it warms up.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    94
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    On a 10 SEER unit, your 105 high side sat may be simulating an 85 degree day, while on a 13 SEER system it may be simulating a 95 degree day. Do you allow for that also. on piston/fixed metering device systems, are you also checking your indoor wetbulb temp to find out what Sh you should have for the outdoor conditions you are trying to simulate.
    Yes, as others have said, there is no way to take perfectly accurate readings on a 40 degree March day. You will be lucky to have an indoor temp as high as 70 rather than the required 75-80. so your WB will probably be useless anyway. Truth be told, probably not perfectly possible on an 90 degree day. 85 or 95 degree simulated ambient or anywhere in the vicinity will allow an experienced tech to judge how the system is doing in general. This will usually work for either metering device. If you can't acheive that SH, then look deeper or schedule to come back later.
    It let's us do the work in March when our boss wants us to bring in some revenue and gives us some work to do when there would otherwise be no work. It also lets the customer get the work done early so that, if their system is not functional, rather than calling on the first hot day of summer when all the other customers are calling and be told that we will not be out for a week, the major problems have already been found and fixed.
    I know that many of us would rather not be out working on chilly March days, but as I said, there are some reasons to get it done and we need to have a reasonable way to do it.
    Do you have a better method that you use in these cases? Or should we just tell the boss that we refuse to do the work under these conditions.
    I am not writing this to be confrontational, but this is something I have struggled with for over 30 years and have never found a reasonable detailed, written procedure that can be accomplished within nthe required time constraints, or any procedure at all.
    Last edited by tchntch; 03-06-2013 at 08:11 AM.

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