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Thread: Boiler Question

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  1. #1
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    Boiler Question

    As a High School student hoping to get into the field,I have been doing some additional research on boilers.

    One question I have is this; "Under what conditions must a boiler be under a 24 hour watch?"

    Both schools I have attended use boilers for hot water heat, and only have staff present during the day.

    Thank you for your time and assitance in answering my question.

  2. #2
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    It depends...

    Around here, if a low pressure boiler is fully automated, it does not require an operator. Hi pressure boilers require an operator during operation.
    If a facility is a 24/7 operation they'll have somebody there. Something like a school may not as they would shut down daily and nut run around the clock.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by timmy2734 View Post
    It depends...

    Around here, if a low pressure boiler is fully automated, it does not require an operator. Hi pressure boilers require an operator during operation.
    If a facility is a 24/7 operation they'll have somebody there. Something like a school may not as they would shut down daily and nut run around the clock.
    Thanks for the reply.

    So all high pressure boilers require an operator, even if they are fully automated?? If so, why??

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by MHall View Post
    Thanks for the reply.

    So all high pressure boilers require an operator, even if they are fully automated?? If so, why??

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9c-wOGOr0io
    If a day goes by and you have learned nothing, I hope you got a lot of sleep.

  5. #5
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    For the most "all encompassing" answer, refer to the rules set by each state.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=Stea...ient=firefox-a

    Asking questions is a great way to expand your knowledge.. If I may be so bold, aim higher than you think you can achieve.

    A person that sets a low goal will achieve their goals easier but will find them less rewarding....

    GT
    If a day goes by and you have learned nothing, I hope you got a lot of sleep.

  6. #6
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    Is an operator required for both Steam boilers and hot water boilers??? I always thought that operators were required with steam only...?

    Thanks.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by MHall View Post
    Is an operator required for both Steam boilers and hot water boilers??? I always thought that operators were required with steam only...?

    Thanks.
    Most cases above 15 PSI Steam.

    The reason for the non specifics is because different locations have different rules.

    As an example, a hydronic heating water boiler here in California requires two low water cut outs.

    GT
    If a day goes by and you have learned nothing, I hope you got a lot of sleep.

  8. #8
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    the word "operator" gets tossed around too easily. There's some guys that are nothing more than switch flippers unfortunately... or sometimes maybe management has them doing other things that they feel are more important.

    then stuff like this happens
    http://www.ipemaritimes.com/bxpl.pdf

    NYC Department of Buildings requires a licensed engineer for hi pressure boilers.

    NYC Fire Department handles the low pressure boiler operation. There's also a DEP Air pollution certificate for residual fuel oil.

  9. #9
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    See above.

  10. #10
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    Blanket statement coming up....

    ANYONE who installs electric heat in a new building when alternatives are available is cheating it's customer.

    Electric heat is the 30+year old technology, not boilers.

    Every building I service that does not have air to air heat pumps has a hot water system.

    Water source heat pumps still use boilers as their primary source of heat.

    GT
    If a day goes by and you have learned nothing, I hope you got a lot of sleep.

  11. #11
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    I personally feel that the largest advancements in mechanical systems in buildings is what we are allowing to leave the tail pipe (so to speak).

    With the new refrigerants (personally whole heartedly disagree with R410A "Puron") and low NOX technologies we are starting to see some of the cleanest buildings in the world.

    I had the opportunity to service a zero carbon emission building in Silicon Valley. Cutting edge stuff.

    Keep asking questions and you may just stumble on a better way do do things...

    Just keep on mind that most people that can think outside the box learned to think inside it first...
    If a day goes by and you have learned nothing, I hope you got a lot of sleep.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GT Jets View Post
    I personally feel that the largest advancements in mechanical systems in buildings is what we are allowing to leave the tail pipe (so to speak).

    With the new refrigerants (personally whole heartedly disagree with R410A "Puron") and low NOX technologies we are starting to see some of the cleanest buildings in the world.

    I had the opportunity to service a zero carbon emission building in Silicon Valley. Cutting edge stuff.

    Keep asking questions and you may just stumble on a better way do do things...

    Just keep on mind that most people that can think outside the box learned to think inside it first...
    Speaking of emmisons that may be one reason for the movement away from boilers....? Perhaps the logic of the developers of a new building, is that electric heat is more environmentaly friendly because there is no flue?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MHall View Post
    Speaking of emmisons that may be one reason for the movement away from boilers....? Perhaps the logic of the developers of a new building, is that electric heat is more environmentaly friendly because there is no flue?
    I personally guarantee the boilers of today can generate more usable heat with less detriment to the environment than electrics... Somebody has to generate the power using fossil somewhere, unless you have a ton of hydro or wind available, we do not.

    GT
    If a day goes by and you have learned nothing, I hope you got a lot of sleep.

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