Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 25
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441

    The hardest thing to do....

    is to teach or train an "experienced technician".

    Why?

    Because to accept said training or teaching, they must first accept or admit that they don't know something....which is too hard on their ego....because they're afraid that they might lose face with their peers.
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Toronto Canada
    Posts
    1,090
    I do not see it like this at all. If you are such a pre madonna That you "Know it all" Then I wouldn't want that type of guy working for me.

    This Trade is ever changing. If someone can't accept a Refresher course or some updating Then they are confused in my mind.

    If the Training is on the Company Dime then they realy have a problem.
    It's not a sign of weakness it shows that you can adapt!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    7,763
    I think you are using the "experience technician" label as a catch term but it's not really that way at all. The experienced technicial is one experienced in learning from the day he/she gets in this trade until he/she ends up in the loose parts box, so to speak.
    "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers it can bribe the public with the public's own money.
    - Alexis de Toqueville, 1835

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    up in the hizzy
    Posts
    1,380
    The hardest thing to do??? how bout working for you! there are some pretty desperate "experienced technician" out there, at the end you get what you paid for and sometimes less.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441
    Quote Originally Posted by valdelocc View Post
    The hardest thing to do??? how bout working for you! there are some pretty desperate "experienced technician" out there, at the end you get what you paid for and sometimes less.
    I knew that I could count on you to make this personal....
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    I think you have it backwards. Experienced techs are just that. Some instructors struggle with being questioned and at times cornered on something they have not seen or considered. Experienced techs want to learn, they have to, but they want answers to questions or potential problems they foresee. I'm going to a manitowok refresher tomorrow and can't wait. I'll have questions and will expect answers.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441
    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy knocker View Post
    I think you have it backwards. Experienced techs are just that. Some instructors struggle with being questioned and at times cornered on something they have not seen or considered. Experienced techs want to learn, they have to, but they want answers to questions or potential problems they foresee. I'm going to a manitowok refresher tomorrow and can't wait. I'll have questions and will expect answers.
    But, is every "experienced technician" technically competent? Or, have large numbers of them made a career of "getting by", changing parts and guessing based on prior experience?

    There is a huge difference. Yes, the true technician who craves knowledge exists...but it's been my observation (as well as the observation of many of my peers) that the vast majority of today's technicians are "experience based", instead of "technically competent".....and those experience-based guys are generally so insecure, that they're almost impossible to teach.
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mid-Mo
    Posts
    3,595
    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy knocker View Post
    . I'll have questions and will expect answers.
    Make sure you say that in an Arnold Swartzenegger voice too.

    I don't know John, it's kinda the same old thing. You can't force anyone to learn that doesn't want to. The whole lead a horse to water but can't make them drink. I know a lot of these types actually. They go to classes and text, mess around, sleep or whatever then get mad when a few of us get sent to all the speciality trainings.

    My boss said it pretty well the other day. You have people who live and learn, then you have others that are just living.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mid-Mo
    Posts
    3,595
    Quote Originally Posted by John Markl View Post
    But, is every "experienced technician" technically competent? Or, have large numbers of them made a career of "getting by", changing parts and guessing based on prior experience?

    There is a huge difference. Yes, the true technician who craves knowledge exists...but it's been my observation (as well as the observation of many of my peers) that the vast majority of today's technicians are "experience based", instead of "technically competent".....and those experience-based guys are generally so insecure, that they're almost impossible to teach.
    I know exactly what you mean by that. We have some people who couldn't use a meter to read voltage across a relay or switch.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    7,763
    There is a big difference in the expectations of my, your generation and what has been taking place in this country and its school system for a good number of years now.

    We were taught analytical thinking or whatever anyone choses to call it. And that was and is a dicipline that is not longer taught. Now we are to rely on information that comes from external sources such as the web, factory 800 numbers, computer type systems or anything that can and will do thinking for us.

    We are dinosaurs, you might as well face it. I did many years ago and have given up on hiring assistance. I only use older guys now who may or may not be mechanically inclined. But I can tell them and give them exact instructions and they always complete what I direct them to do. And they are thankful for the work AND find it very interesting. No, I don't let them near anything that could do them in until I'm sure they are safe.
    "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers it can bribe the public with the public's own money.
    - Alexis de Toqueville, 1835

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    6,320
    Quote Originally Posted by John Markl View Post
    is to teach or train an "experienced technician".

    Why?

    Because to accept said training or teaching, they must first accept or admit that they don't know something....which is too hard on their ego....because they're afraid that they might lose face with their peers.
    What's plan B ?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,982
    Alot of the smart, motivated people in life stayed far away from the HVAC field. They did things like med school, law school, engineering etc. Then whatever sharp ones were left, many of them started their own gig. So that leaves just a few desirable guys out there. If you want one, you usually got to pay the man to get and keep him.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441
    Quote Originally Posted by VTP99 View Post
    What's plan B ?
    Grow your own?
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event