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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    The dark side of the moon.
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    Our nominal voltage single phase 50Hz is 230 VAC. 246v is not really much out of spec to be honest. There might be more to the situation, dirty voltage or bad transient voltage problems.

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  3. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    In the USA , 120 VAC devices are actually rated 125 VAC . Same , 240 -> 250 VAC . I gave actually seen 255 VAC . Some of this depends on if you ate close to the " end of the line " or the head of the line " , of a run of primary ?

    Some transformers have or had taps , the power company could adjust the secondary voltage , to some extent ?

    I have also seen voltage vary with time of day , with load . In the summer , around 05:00 PM , when A/C's get turned to max , electric ranges , washing machines , clothes dryers , water heaters and every thing in the house gets turned on .

    God bless
    Wyr

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  5. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    In the US if you have had to replace equipment due to overvoltage, you can make the power company put a voltage monitor on your line, this is a portable device that records voltage levels for a month or so. This will also record spikes and so on. If an isolation transformer solved it then very likely there's distribution problems. If your in the US and the power company balks then threaten to go to the PUC as all of them are regulated. My father sold high voltage power distribution gear for all his life and quite often power companies find things like failing step down transformers in their distribution systems due to industrial users complaining.

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  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    2,859
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    You need to "pay" the the utility to put "their" voltage spike, transient arrestor(s) on your panel(s). I did that years ago after repeated small motor losses, I'm now covered under their insurance. BTW don't expect to make a claim and get paid for damages without this. They have more ways of getting out of paying than a mongoose getting out of a paper bag.
    I only have to make it work till I retire.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    I would look at what kind of compressor they were if the voltage was 246 and that killed them. Run all kinds of compressors all day long here on 255.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by WyrTwister View Post
    In the USA , 120 VAC devices are actually rated 125 VAC . Same , 240 -> 250 VAC . I gave actually seen 255 VAC . Some of this depends on if you ate close to the " end of the line " or the head of the line " , of a run of primary ?

    Some transformers have or had taps , the power company could adjust the secondary voltage , to some extent ?

    I have also seen voltage vary with time of day , with load . In the summer , around 05:00 PM , when A/C's get turned to max , electric ranges , washing machines , clothes dryers , water heaters and every thing in the house gets turned on .

    God bless
    Wyr
    Nearly everything around here is at 255. We are at the head of the grid and that's the usual reading. Anything that says 208-230 runs fine on that. I would look at who installed the equipment or the brand of compressor first. In the summer most things run all day long unless they are well insulated or inside a building. And the extra money to switch to a scroll upon failure is always worth it. I would be more likely to believe something was not done. Like a crankcase heater left out or something before I would blame voltage less than the max I have seen. Even the compressor I just installed on a rare delta three phase system is running fine on 244. What you have to watch for there is it has a wild leg at 214. That will kill refrigerators or anything else if someone that doesn't know installs a circuit in a three phase panel that is single phase. The only place you can be certain it is safe is on leg #1 2 or three are the only legal place to put it but it will be 1 coming in. It took weeks for me to figure out this power system and no one will give me information. It's really frustrating.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
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    6,971
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    If a compressor fails and the cause isn't found a repeat failure is likely.
    Failures are almost always external to the compressor. If possible open the compressor
    because often the evidence will be there. I've even opened hermetics at times.

    One of the best classes I've gone to was Carrier's tear down school analyze failures.
    A voltage problem will be obvious.
    I should have played the g'tar on the MTV. MK

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    SMW Lu49

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  12. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
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    66
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    Too much voltage 246v from power company

    Quote Originally Posted by hvacker View Post
    If a compressor fails and the cause isn't found a repeat failure is likely.
    Failures are almost always external to the compressor. If possible open the compressor
    because often the evidence will be there. I've even opened hermetics at times.

    One of the best classes I've gone to was Carrier's tear down school analyze failures.
    A voltage problem will be obvious.
    I just don't think 246 is enough to kill them. That's what everything is running on here at the club. And that's still 9 Amps lower than the power around here usually is.


    Two wrongs don't make a right but three lefts do.

  13. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,859
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    One thing that voltage will kill, is a 208 volt water heater element.
    I only have to make it work till I retire.

  14. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
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    Quote Originally Posted by madhat View Post
    One thing that voltage will kill, is a 208 volt water heater element.
    Years ago I had a bunch of element problems. About one every six months. Then I tried one that was curvy. I don't remember the name but it worked on a watt density idea where the same output was put in a longer element by putting a bunch of bends in it.
    It was the last one I had to change. It also ran cooler per inch and did not get calcium build up like a regular element would.
    I should have played the g'tar on the MTV. MK

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    SMW Lu49

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