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  1. #1
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    Dec 2011
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    Hiram, Ohio
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    orientation of cased coil on furnace.

    Goodman GMVM with a 18 seer HP with matched cased coil. The outlet of the furnace and therefore inlet and outlet of the cased coil are square with .25". Does it matter regarding airflow or anything else if the coil is placed on top of the furnace 90 degrees or 180 degrees rotated? The installer wants to do this for ease of the AC line. Access to the doors of both the furnace and the coil will be fine. Thanks, Mike.

  2. #2
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    If you are talking rotating 180 front to back, no, makes no difference.
    A good HVAC tech knows how, an educated HVAC tech knows why!

    DEM


  3. #3
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    Yeah, 180 degrees or 90 degrees.. Is 90 degrees a bad thing? I will ask my guy to clarify what he has in mind.

  4. #4
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    Aug 2010
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    West Monroe, LA
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    Most coils made today are muti-position meaning they can be up flow, down flow or horz. Application.

    Need to make sure with your installer on the coil and furnace that they both can be used in any postion or will work with how your new system will need to be installed/placed.

    This should not be a problem for your dealer as equipment specs will tell him this.

    Are you asking if on the furnace that will be upflow if the front of the coil can be turned around to where the front/where refrigerant lines come out can be placed at the back of the unit? If so then yes should be a problem would look werid but depending on the line set might be easier for install?

  5. #5
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    Pretty sure he is just talking about spinning the coil so the lines face the side or back, not really changing the postion of the coil from up to horizontal.
    A good HVAC tech knows how, an educated HVAC tech knows why!

    DEM


  6. #6
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    thanks to all. Yes, Heaterman has the right picture in his mind. 1/4 or 1/2 "spin" Is this okay?

  7. #7
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    Yes
    A good HVAC tech knows how, an educated HVAC tech knows why!

    DEM


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    SW Wisconsin
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    The important factor is that the coil must be positioned so that there is a uniform flow of air through all the number of circuits the coil has.

    This unbalanced heat-load occurs when entry of air is uneven across the coil... If one circuit didn't get enough of a heat-load to evaporate the refrigerant that circuit would cause a cold suction line, with a TXV it would reduce refrigerant flow to all circuits, starving the entire coil; acting like a refrigerant restriction.

    With a fixed-piston metering device it might slug the compressor with liquid refrigerant. Just portraying some possible airflow problems to always consider...dirty coils affecting some circuits a lot more than others - also needs checking on older systems.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Cincinnati, Oh
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    Quote Originally Posted by duckman06 View Post
    Most coils made today are muti-position meaning they can be up flow, down flow or horz. Application.
    Goodmans are not. The coils are downflow/upflow only. Their multi position furnaces do horizontal/upflow only.
    Air handlers are the only true all position resi equitment they have.

    A horizontal coil is required for horizontal positions, and a downflow furnace would be required for downflow.


    As far as rotating the coil, the only problem your contractor may run into, is that the furnace is required to slope toward the front of the unit. Meaning if he rotates the coil 180*, he better make sure that coil is still pitched in the correct direction.
    If he installs a metal "shim" between the coil and the furnace, do not be surprised, that is not unusual.

    I would personally rather have the coil "backwards", because then I don't have to deal with the flues when we inspect/replace a coil/txv.
    "Better tell the sandman to stay away, because we're gonna be workin on this one all night."

    "Dude, you need more than 2 wires to a condenser to run a 2 stage heatpump."

    "Just get it done son."

    Dad adjusted

  10. #10
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    FWIW, I found one short sentence in the manual that states "the front of the coil must be positioned with the front of the furnace" - does this have something to do with the reasons Udarrell stated above? I will point this out to my tech, but would like any other feedback anyone would have to offer. Thanks, Mike

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Cincinnati, Oh
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    Quote Originally Posted by troyport View Post
    FWIW, I found one short sentence in the manual that states "the front of the coil must be positioned with the front of the furnace" - does this have something to do with the reasons Udarrell stated above? I will point this out to my tech, but would like any other feedback anyone would have to offer. Thanks, Mike
    I wouldn't worry about it, if he's pointing it toward the back of the furnace.

    I've done it many, many times.
    They are most likely worried about the furnace tilt, although I cannot say for certain.
    "Better tell the sandman to stay away, because we're gonna be workin on this one all night."

    "Dude, you need more than 2 wires to a condenser to run a 2 stage heatpump."

    "Just get it done son."

    Dad adjusted

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