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  1. #1

    Unusual Return Air Source: Deliberate or Mistake?

    Summary: I'm doing some remodeling in our home and was surprised to find a return air opening in a strange spot (in a sealed joist bay between my main floor and basement), I'd appreciate any suggestions.

    Situation: The house is a raised ranch in Ohio, built in 1959. It had no central air when built. The basement was "semi-finished": Painted concrete block walls (no insulation), but with an original fireplace and a ceiling attached to the joists. Supply and return ducts are in the basement. The basement has a few supply registers (about 100 sq inches for the 1000 sq ft basement) with no obvious return air opening in the basement. The main floor has floor supply registers in all rooms and the return air comes through three large grills in the central hall to a single central duct. The door to the basement has a gap of 1 1/2" at the bottom, and I just assumed the air from the basement flowed through this gap to reach the return air grills on the main floor. However, when I was doing some work in the basement I removed the ceiling and found about 32" of the return air duct had been opened up on top so that it was drawing air in from two joist bays between the main floor and basement. There are no grills or other signs that these bays were being deliberately used for return air.

    Possibilities:
    a) The opening was cut before the ceiling was installed in the basement and was meant to serve as a return air point in the basement (if so, it is about 3 times larger than the supply registers in the basement)
    b) It was a mistake.

    Right now the basement has a slight negative pressure when the fan is running. When I close off the hole the basement is neutral (i.e. I can't detect any airflow under the door gap leading upstairs using smoke/tissue.) I'm not sure why the air isn't rushing under the door to reach the main floor return grills, unless maybe there are just a lot of leaks in the return duct.

    I've got a natural-draft water heater in the basement. I'm thinking I'd be much better off by sealing up this basement return air source. Any thoughts or suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    West Monroe, LA
    Posts
    1,529
    You need to call a pro out to review over your system and its setup to provide you with a Soultion to the problem. To many variables to list without seeing the job. Pics would be good but still need to get someone out that understands duct work to advice on what can and can't be done!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,599
    I agree with the ductmister.........not enough information to make a judgement from cyberspace. A diagram or pictures would help. What are the return air grille sizes? Are they in the walls or the floor?

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by George2 View Post
    I agree with the ductmister.........not enough information to make a judgement from cyberspace. A diagram or pictures would help. What are the return air grille sizes? Are they in the walls or the floor?
    George,
    The three return air grills are each 32" x 5". They or on the floor of the central hallway on the main level. The return air duct itself is 20" x 8" at the biggest point. The unexpected "hole to nowhere" is near the far end of the return air duct where the duct has been reduced down to 12" x 8". There's one more floor grill at that point that already has 1.5 times the area of the duct, so the extra hole into the joist bay seems superfluous.

    I agree it's difficult to diagnose from a distance. To me, the main indicator si that I've got neutral pressure (i.e. apparently balanced return) in the basement when I close up the hole. If I leave it open then I've got negative pressure in the basement and that doesn't sound like a good thing.

    Thanks again.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,599
    I would think that it would be the other way around. Leaving the supply open in the basement would reduce the negative pressure in that area.

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