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  1. #1

    Expanding Indoor Filtration

    I have a typical in-wall filter in the hall of my house. I keep reading about how much better it would be for both the system and house air quality to have at least a 5 inch thick filter. Is it possible to replace the filter bracket housing with one that would allow me to fit a bigger filter in the unit? I have searched online and have yet to see any bracket offered that I could purchase. It is held in place by just 4 screws and looks really simple to replace. The bracket on the wall is by a door which has plenty of room to allow me to add a bigger bracket for the filter. Thanks for the input!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    East coast USA
    Posts
    976
    the thicker the filter the harder the AC unit will work, Unless your system is designed for this type of filter. I'm pretty sure your house is designed this way.. Stay with a simple pleated filter and change it when it is dirty.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    907
    Quote Originally Posted by dlove View Post
    the thicker the filter the harder the AC unit will work, Unless your system is designed for this type of filter. I'm pretty sure your house is designed this way.. Stay with a simple pleated filter and change it when it is dirty.
    That's wrong if it's a pleated filter. All else being equal, the greater the surface area of the filter, the better. Thicker pleated filters have more filter area (unless the number of pleats is lowered too much). That being said, if you increase both the thickness and the resistance of the filter (higher MERV)... it could go either way depending.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    East coast USA
    Posts
    976
    Quote Originally Posted by pmeunier View Post
    That's wrong if it's a pleated filter. All else being equal, the greater the surface area of the filter, the better. Thicker pleated filters have more filter area (unless the number of pleats is lowered too much). That being said, if you increase both the thickness and the resistance of the filter (higher MERV)... it could go either way depending.
    My statement was not wrong ....When you install a higher efficiency filter it will effect the AC unit...UNLESS the unit is designed for it....So many people add better filters no knowing thier static and this effects the system ....I was just keeping it simple..

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,534
    Quote Originally Posted by dlove View Post
    My statement was not wrong ....When you install a higher efficiency filter it will effect the AC unit...UNLESS the unit is designed for it....So many people add better filters no knowing thier static and this effects the system ....I was just keeping it simple..
    There are three basic filtering concepts. The 1" spun filbergalss with a merv 3-5 low restriction and low filteringing.
    Next is the drop in 1" pleated merv 7-8 which more restrictive but a better filter.
    Number 3 is the 2" merv 7-9 which is less restricted than the 1" pleated, more restrictive than the 1" fiberglass.
    Last is the 4"-5" pleated clothe merv 9-14 filter.
    The are limitations on all of these filters with specific recommondations for the sizing.
    Caution about off the cuff recommendations about filter without clarification and real knowledge.
    Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    81
    The thicker the filter, the lower the static pressure drop assuming the same material is used. A 5 inch Merv 10 will have like 10-15 pleats. A Merv 16 will have a lot more. The added surface area gives more room for the air to pass through keeps the static down.

    As far as an indoor grill that can house one, I've looked before and havent found them. You can find 2 inch grills though. For the 5 inch, you have to have a cabinet installed between the return plenum and the furnace/air handler. This is the best option anyways cuz most systems have leaks. In this case, at least the leaked air will get filtered before it enters your system and goes back into your house.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    The Zone
    Posts
    392
    I went to a 4 inch filter for allergy reasons my 5 ton system does not get enough air flow through it but it is zoned so I'm running marginally anyway. Saving grace is ECM motor but it does not really draw a lot of current the torque sensors must be happy. My allergies never abated till I went Merv 13 and what a difference that made I still want to get statics done to check pressure drop though. My cleaning lady told me I was keeping the house cleaner cause she had to dust less when I mentioned the filter she had me out at her house retrofitting one for once I was glad the unit was in the attic.
    It's Hammer Time!

  8. #8
    Yes, you can change out the brackets. It's only an inch, half inch on each side, so you should have the room to play with. Just make sure it's compatible with your system.

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