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  1. #1
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    May 2004
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    Compressor Analyzer

    I do a lot of small unit repair: coolers, reach-ins, sandwich preps, etc. I've run into my fair share of 'clicking' compressors. Now, it's pretty easy to test the cap, but the relay is a big mystery. Is an analyzer a good investment? I was looking at the UEI HA1, and I like the ability to 'rock' a locked rotor to see if it'll unlock. Also, does it bypass the start components? It seems like if it's all true it would save on replacing compressors when unlocking it would work.

    Thanks


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  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Ponchatoula, LA
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    Thanks wptski! Does the analyzer work as advertised?


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  4. #4
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    Aug 2009
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    Maine
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    Not quite as good as advertised, and as DC compressors become more common the analyzer won't do crap. They can rock a compressor loose, but compressor won't last very long and will still need replacement. If you insist on buying one check FleaBay. 2 cents worth from me.

  5. #5
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    More common in small appliances? I haven't seen any DC compressors in the self-contained equipment at all. I'm looking to see if it's worth the investment to counter a compressor replacement on a 'locked rotor', if in fact the issue actually lies within the start components. As well as the cases were simply reversing the power to free it solves the issue. I had a case recently where a fairly new beer cooler was out. Showed up and the condenser was filthy, like afghan sweater filthy. The compressor was hot and clicking without starting. Ran the numbers for warranty support. Ordered the compressor and a couple days later the owner called and said, "hey, I plugged it back in and it works!" Well, I felt like an idiot. Went over there and sure enough, it was running and amps were in spec and the thing has run ever since. I want to make sure that if I'm replacing a compressor because it's locked that it is in fact dead and un-revivable.


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    A pat on the back is nothing more then topical anesthesia for a knife.

  6. #6
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    Dec 2012
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    If I was you ide get one

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  7. #7
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    Yep.
    Quote Originally Posted by Core_d View Post
    If I was you ide get one

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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Fremont, Indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by r22coolguy View Post
    More common in small appliances? I haven't seen any DC compressors in the self-contained equipment at all. I'm looking to see if it's worth the investment to counter a compressor replacement on a 'locked rotor', if in fact the issue actually lies within the start components. As well as the cases were simply reversing the power to free it solves the issue. I had a case recently where a fairly new beer cooler was out. Showed up and the condenser was filthy, like afghan sweater filthy. The compressor was hot and clicking without starting. Ran the numbers for warranty support. Ordered the compressor and a couple days later the owner called and said, "hey, I plugged it back in and it works!" Well, I felt like an idiot. Went over there and sure enough, it was running and amps were in spec and the thing has run ever since. I want to make sure that if I'm replacing a compressor because it's locked that it is in fact dead and un-revivable.


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    You're not trying hard enough!!!

    I've got an older anny, but haven't used her in years.
    Member of the "Work Exchange Program"
    "Will work for knowledge"

    "Everyone is a genius. But if you judge a fish on its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid"
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  9. #9
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    May 2004
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    Compressor Analyzer

    Maybe I'm not, but other than testing the cap and verifying LRA, I'm not sure what else I should have been doing. As I understand it, there is no test for a start relay, so what else should I be doing?

    p.s. I was looking at a couple of A-12 Annies on EBay, but not sure if that's a better solution then the UEI.

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  10. #10
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    Oct 2012
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    Wisconsin
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    Yes. You definitely want a compressor analyzer.

    There are quite a few options out there, some very fancy and some not so fancy.

    There is no definitive way to test a start relay, even if it ohms out good it still might not be operating properly.

    Don't forget about voltage drop either. If you are getting low voltage while the compressor is trying to start, it won't be able to (i.e. 120 volt compressor only getting 80 volts at startup due to loose wire). A compressor analyzer with a built in analog voltmeter is nice for this.

    So if you can start a compressor with the compressor analyzer, you know the compressor is most likely fine and it's a problem with start components or something else electrical.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by r22coolguy View Post
    More common in small appliances? I haven't seen any DC compressors in the self-contained equipment at all. I'm looking to see if it's worth the investment to counter a compressor replacement on a 'locked rotor', if in fact the issue actually lies within the start components. As well as the cases were simply reversing the power to free it solves the issue. I had a case recently where a fairly new beer cooler was out. Showed up and the condenser was filthy, like afghan sweater filthy. The compressor was hot and clicking without starting. Ran the numbers for warranty support. Ordered the compressor and a couple days later the owner called and said, "hey, I plugged it back in and it works!" Well, I felt like an idiot. Went over there and sure enough, it was running and amps were in spec and the thing has run ever since. I want to make sure that if I'm replacing a compressor because it's locked that it is in fact dead and un-revivable.


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    CK pic. You can do any checks & test that the analyzer does your self. Just ask on this site, what test, what checks you are wanting to do. If you can buy analyzer real,real, cheap-might be worthwhile??
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  13. #12
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    Dec 2012
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    columbus, OH
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    Or keep a lil relay or supco motor starter handy and use your150$ multimeter... Imo

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  14. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
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    Fremont, Indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by r22coolguy View Post
    Maybe I'm not, but other than testing the cap and verifying LRA, I'm not sure what else I should have been doing. As I understand it, there is no test for a start relay, so what else should I be doing?

    p.s. I was looking at a couple of A-12 Annies on EBay, but not sure if that's a better solution then the UEI.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I'll throw a 3 & 1 on after it cools, if it doesn't start I replace it, if it starts, it gets left on until OEM parts get in.
    But there's no way I would leave a compressor that is cycling off O.L. (clicking) just so the customer can re-diagnose my diagnosis and make me look bad.... he'll never trust your diagnostic again!
    I still keep the Annie on the truck, but I'll pull my TI quick start out before the Annie

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