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  1. #1
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    High pressure transducer

    Where do you like to see them installed, hot gas or liquid line?

  2. #2
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    If the purpose is to act as a high pressure safety that opens on rising pressure, the compressor discharge line is where it should go.

    If the purpose is low ambient fan cycling or permission where it closes on a rise in pressure, then it's the liquid line.
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    2 Tim 3:16-17

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  3. #3
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    Let's have all the Pro's post their questions in the Pro forum, too.
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    2 Tim 3:16-17

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  4. #4
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    Its only used for information, the unit has a HP cutout and separate transducer for condenser fan control.

  5. #5
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    Either where you removed the old one from or discharge, high pressure gas pipe. It seems to cause less problems when you need to remove it from there, in the future.

  6. #6
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    If it is for building automation, i would prefer the discharge gas line. It would provide more accurate conditions than the liquid line.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by jayguy View Post
    If it is for building automation, i would prefer the discharge gas line. It would provide more accurate conditions than the liquid line.
    Not used for automation, it only used in a display that does absolutely nothing.


    BTW, they put the Penn VFD transducers in the hot gas line, high pressure cut out is in the liquid line.

  8. #8
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    So. You're just using this post as a poll to prove that your customer or controls guy is wrong?

    I think If you had 5 controls guys in a room, and asked them this same question, you'd get at Least 50 different answers.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by 71CHOPS View Post
    So. You're just using this post as a poll to prove that your customer or controls guy is wrong?

    I think If you had 5 controls guys in a room, and asked them this same question, you'd get at Least 50 different answers.
    Where should I send the chicken dinner?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimp View Post
    Not used for automation, it only used in a display that does absolutely nothing.


    BTW, they put the Penn VFD transducers in the hot gas line, high pressure cut out is in the liquid line.
    If it does nothing, then it is just a matter of the pressure you want to read. If you want to know the pressure in the discharge line, put it there....etc.
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    2 Tim 3:16-17

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