Dirty coils use less freon than clean coils? Seriously? - Page 3
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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,600
    this thread reinforces one thing before you do any work to a unit that is going to be billable beyond the clean and check explain the charges to the home owner and get it authorized ,then it is there option to get a second opinion.
    We really need change now

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,708
    Quote Originally Posted by catmanacman View Post
    this thread reinforces one thing before you do any work to a unit that is going to be billable beyond the clean and check explain the charges to the home owner and get it authorized ,then it is there option to get a second opinion.
    It also reinforces a second idea.

    The homeowner has the responsibility to understand what is being covered by any agreement, and to realize that what is not covered by the agreement is going to be billable work.

    The words "maintenance agreement" do not mean that the system will be maintained for free for a certain period of time, regardless of what goes wrong.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,502
    Dirty coils obviously change pressures. A dirty evap coil lowers suction pressure and a dirty condenser raises discharge pressure. A resi. split system will continue to function for yrs with a low charge usually undercharged at installation, of coarse the end result will probably be high electric bills and finally a dead compressor and the home owner will be non the wiser.
    Trying not to be a Hack.

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