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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    5

    Price of New System

    I am having an addition built and contractor uses own subs. I was given an est for complete install of Lennox XP19 (3ton or 4ton) 2-zone system and new ductwork. 2425 sq ft total heated/cooled space. Have elec basebrd in existing part of home. No ductwork exists. Will be perfoming a Manual J in 2 weeks. Approx est is $XXXXX complete. Does this sound in-line? Live in the Northeast. Not sure if I can get other estimates in time.

    I guess you did not read the rules of the site about pricing questions. There is no way any professional can tell you if that price is acceptable or not with out seeing the actual job.
    Last edited by ARPA; 12-31-2006 at 01:45 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    So, no thought was given to this earlier?

    Not supposed to post pricing here.

    As to whether or not it is in line, only other *qualified* bids will tell you.

    Plenty of material in the Wall of Shame from people that chose their contractors poorly, so choose wisely.
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    17,898
    I hear the sound of MOD's approaching.
    " Kill a Commie for Mommy! "

    - Colonel David Hackworth (1930-2005), Korean War Vet

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Dixie
    Posts
    1,344
    Quote Originally Posted by coolwhip View Post
    I hear the sound of MOD's approaching.
    very heavy feet

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Howell, Michigan
    Posts
    16,176
    Quote Originally Posted by frigetater View Post
    very heavy feet
    LOL...........Arpa beat me to that one...........

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    5
    Nope, sorry, never read the rules. Sorry. But why is everything always a secret? That will always keep us novices and unknowing homeowners out of the know. I wish we all had all the time to research every topic, but sadly our lives are always 100 miles per hour. My expertise is nursing. Well, will just have to hope for the best.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naples, Fla.
    Posts
    1,403
    It's not a secret Bud, there are just too many variables involved, this isn't as simplistic as plugging in a new refrigerator out of the box.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    There is plenty of information here and elsewhere on the internet to learn about what makes or breaks a good HVAC system and contractor.

    Three different contractors can bid your job and give you nine different prices in the "good, better, best" format. It is impossible to make an informed decision based soley on price in any catergory because of installation standards (or lack thereof).

    You must be an educated consumer and learn the questions to ask. Smart contractors will answer them (without telling you how to do the job) and allow you to get the best system for your budget.

    It is probably fair to assume that you have spent more time planning finishes, lighting, outlet locations and other exposed work than the time spent to ensure that your HVAC system is done right.

    Lots of luck.
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    S.W. PA
    Posts
    3,298
    you can ask any questions you want about the system just not to fix or price it reasons why if someone tells you how to fix it and leave out the smallest detail it can cause damage to the system, injury or death the the person trying the repair
    as for pricing no one know what is involved in that job unless they see it if they are not from you area they dont know what permits and fees apply, if its not seen we can not guess whether it is a cake job or a pia so thats why we cant give out prices here not to mention the overhead and expenses in different areas are different

  10. #10

    Cool

    From the cost perspective, best advice anyone ever gave me was to request an written itemized estimate. Contractors in this field never seem to willingly give itemized estimates. I live in the "nice" area of town and contractors love to stick it to naive home owners. I've seen quotes that were double for what I thought was the same product. They may even tell you that they are only making $XXX off of this job if you get an itemized estimate. This will help you understand what is reasonable to do a particular job. If it only takes two hour to do a job and the contractor is making $XXXX, something might be wrong with the estimate. Also understand that they must make a living, but it should be reasonable for the service that is provided.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    Quote Originally Posted by signalmountainman View Post
    From the cost perspective, best advice anyone ever gave me was to request an written itemized estimate. Contractors in this field never seem to willingly give itemized estimates. I live in the "nice" area of town and contractors love to stick it to naive home owners. I've seen quotes that were double for what I thought was the same product. They may even tell you that they are only making $XXX off of this job if you get an itemized estimate. This will help you understand what is reasonable to do a particular job. If it only takes two hour to do a job and the contractor is making $XXXX, something might be wrong with the estimate. Also understand that they must make a living, but it should be reasonable for the service that is provided.
    And who are you to determine what is "reasonable for the service provided"?

    Lawyers seem to have no trouble collecting $450 an hour for their services...
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
    Posts
    15,918
    Quote Originally Posted by neophytes serendipity View Post
    And who are you to determine what is "reasonable for the service provided"?

    Lawyers seem to have no trouble collecting $450 an hour for their services...
    Yea you ever had surgery? Just the Doc's fee not the Hospital or nothing else was $2500.00 and only took 45 minutes hell I am in the wrong business.
    Hey Doc's are Professionals and so are we why don't we make the same?
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". - Vernon Law

    "Never let success go to your head, and never let failure go to your heart". - Unknown

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,271

    Question Planning TAKES TIME

    [QUOTE=budboy;1322064] I am having an addition built and contractor uses own subs. ... (3ton or 4ton) 2-zone system and new ductwork. 2425 sq ft total heated/cooled space. Have elec basebrd in existing part of home.

    .....................
    NICE Size addition IF PLANNED WELL.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

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