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  1. #53
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,108
    Direct drive, 180-390 tons.
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  2. #54
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    ottawa canada
    Posts
    2,081
    Quote Originally Posted by Tech Rob View Post
    Direct drive, 180-390 tons.
    Ditto ... low pressure to .
    The 64 roars to life Whoo hoo ...shes a rolling chassis .
    You bend em" I"ll mend em" !!!!!!!
    I"m not a service tech.. I"m a thermodynamic transfer analyst & strategic system sustainability specialist
    Best Austin Healey In Show twice in 2013 .....All those hrs paid off .

  3. #55
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    The Heart of It All
    Posts
    258
    was in la crosse and was told they are direct drive so no gears. also was told one needs to becareful with wrenches around the motor because the magnets have a 500 lb pull and could be bad for the fingers.

  4. #56
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,108
    Quote Originally Posted by desto1 View Post
    was in la crosse and was told they are direct drive so no gears. also was told one needs to becareful with wrenches around the motor because the magnets have a 500 lb pull and could be bad for the fingers.
    So I guess we'll all need to get some stainless steel wrenches and aluminum sockets!
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  5. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    2,106
    I have heard that it is low speed, and will use R123, but is compatible for the new refrigerant (R245fa?).

  6. #58
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Calgary AB
    Posts
    42
    Looks like a bench grinder with a paint job, is it same old trane junk that you've gotta glue together with loctite?

  7. #59
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Not in Iran
    Posts
    1,106
    Ouch Arron!

    This is will interesting to see what happens in the future though, I believe this is the first oil free machine that Trane has developed, . The oil free seems to becoming more common in the centrifugal market, Trane needed and did come out with the oil free system to compete in the oil free market. And I love the small footprint !!!
    Only available in the 200 to 400 ton range as of now.
    no signature blast'em man blast'em
    !!!KILL THE TERRORIST!!!

  8. #60
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Calgary AB
    Posts
    42
    By the time this unit hits the market the oil free will be a thing of the past

  9. #61
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,191
    Quote Originally Posted by aaron604 View Post
    By the time this unit hits the market the oil free will be a thing of the past
    Doubt it.

  10. #62
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Calgary AB
    Posts
    42
    Quote Originally Posted by KnewYork View Post
    Doubt it.
    Youre right, I'm being sarcastic. Just pointing out that Trane seems to be taking forever to put out a modern machine is all.

  11. #63
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,108
    Their R&D does move at a glacial pace. I'd rather that than have them rush some P.O.S. to the market so they can say "Me too".
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

  12. #64
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Calgary AB
    Posts
    42
    I still get the feeling their equipment is engineered by 4 year old students from Nepal that are being told to "do math". I just don't have a lot of patience for machines that use loctite as gaskets and expect you to use a clear plastic hose to check refrigerant level in the evap.

  13. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3,108
    I think the simplicity of Trane's design is genius. Eventually, if you're around them enough, everything else begins to look like an over-engineered and over-controlled P.O.S. We all know, however, that there's at least one thing that every manufacturer got right with their machines that the other guys got wrong.

    What do you have against using a clear hose to see where the refrigerant is at? You can use this method on almost any flooded chiller. It's especially useful if you just weighed the charge in and want to mark it for the future. Besides, it's only one of the things that we can use to determine charge levels. It's not like you're going to go straight to checking the level while ignoring the water temps, evap. approach, vane position, motor current, etc. Is it easier to hook up a clear hose or to recover and weigh the charge?
    "There is no greater inequality than the equal treatment of unequals."

    -Thomas Jefferson

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