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  1. #1

    When to replace heat pump

    Hello,

    My heat pump was installed in 1995. My house is 3100 sqft. Some vaulted ceilings...the rest 9'. There are 2 stories. I live in the Pacific Northwest. Need anything else?

    My wife is always complaining that the house is never warm...I could agree with her but then I would be whining...
    Anyway, I'm not sure if my heat pump is working as well as it could. It seems, it should be able to heat my house warmer than I would like it if I chose to do so and if I wanted to pay the utility bill....unfortunately that is not the case.

    My question is, how do I know when I need to replace it AND I have heard that new heat pumps are much more efficient than they once were....can anyone explain that to me, or put that in perspective? Are they so much more efficient that it would be worth replacing based on the age of my system? I just want to be able to heat my house comfortably without breaking the bank, both with electric bills and the cost of a new system.

    Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,991
    A new, properly sized heat pump will be more efficient and comfortable.
    Has your current system ever been serviced?
    "Hey Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort." And he says, "there won't be any money, but when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness." So I got that goin' for me, which is nice. - Carl Spackler

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    between here and over there
    Posts
    453
    well it all depends on your geographic location.
    Last edited by Trehak01; 01-28-2013 at 08:36 PM.

  4. #4
    I had to add refrigerant earlier this year. I have not had it serviced per se.

    As to Trehak01... more specific than Pacific Northwest? How about West of the mountains...like Portland metro?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    6,721
    Refrigerent (R22) which is more than likely what is in your unit is getting really, really expensive because the EPA is getting rid of it. So if your unit needs freon again its going to cost substantially more than the last time you had some added. Hvac systems last ~15years so its probably about that time. You can sometimes get a better deal if you proactively change out during late winter/early spring or fall instead of it being an emergency change out on the hottest/coldest day of the year.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SE Washington
    Posts
    525
    im also a pacific norwester, eastside, 15-18 years is normal life for an outdoor unit of a heat pump system, if it was properly sized you should be able to maintain temp, new units can be up to 65% more efficien, chect out the Carrier Greenspeed, model 25VNA, an excellent machine for our area!
    Total Energy Management, inc

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    King Ranch Texas
    Posts
    216
    when it dies
    Sic semper tyrannis

    ‚——’ฏฏ‘;====ฑ—- * * * * * *
    !‚–’ฏฏƒนถ

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    3,477
    I'd not recommend spending any substantial money to repair this heat pump as it is pretty well at the end of it's normal life span. The newer systems are more efficient and will save you money along with the new variable speed indoor units, you could also be more comfortable. But the decision to replace will still need to be made. I'd call some reputable companies in your area and they should be able to give you some ROI figures. Since the existing system is still operating, you've got the time to investigate your options. Feel free to post your progress!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,639
    Happy wife happy life.
    My name is TooCoolforschool and I am a chronic over charger.

  10. #10
    Some good advice in here... Thanks for your help.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,271
    Quote Originally Posted by nmlazz View Post
    Hello,

    My heat pump was installed in 1995.
    My house is 3100 sqft. Some vaulted ceilings...the rest 9'.
    There are 2 stories. I live in the Pacific Northwest. Need anything else?

    ... can anyone explain that to me, or put that in perspective?
    Are they so much more efficient that it would be worth replacing based on the age of my system?
    Reduce Operating cost about 25% +.
    Your heating costs might be ~ 60% to 80% of your electric bill.

    Provide Current electric bills including kwHr used for last 24 months
    ( generally available on-line from your electric utility)

    Model number of condenser (outside unit / probably 10 SEER)
    Could improve to about 15 SEER / 9 HSPF.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Portland OR
    Posts
    1,975
    Are you gas or electric backup? A lot of homes in Portland Metro are gas backups like I have, I live in Clackamas. I can only assume your system is R22 which has recently sky rocketed in price so if you have a repair it will be time to start looking at a new system that is R410 and warrantied.

    If you are all electric you can certainly save by not going into backup gas or electric with the inverter heat pumps that are now available if you are looking for the most efficient. Otherwise to meet Federal, PGE, Energy Trust of Oregon and ODOE rebate standards 15 SEER and 9+ HSPF with a 12.5+ EER will get you the maximum rebates.

    If you need any service or tune up or are looking for a new system please give Sky Heating a call and take a look at our YouTube channel to see some heat pumps we have installed in the Portland Area. We are also a large Geothermal/ground source heat pump dealer so if that is an option we can show you how you can have an HSPF(although geo is not rated in HSPF) that is closer to 15-18 with a well installed geothermal system.

    -Travis Smith
    Owner Sky Heating & Air Conditioning
    Check out my YouTube channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/skyheating1 We have customer testimonials, product reviews and more!
    Like us on FACEBOOK if you like our advice here!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,271
    Quote Originally Posted by nmlazz View Post

    As to Trehak01...
    more specific than Pacific Northwest?
    How about West of the mountains...like Portland metro?
    Most people actually know where they live [ without the ? mark ]
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

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