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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    866
    Either u gotto some f ed up stuff goin on or yer insternents are out.... its friday and im well into a case so im having a hard time deciphering the numbers.. oh and go Canucks,!! Sorry ****cago blackcocks

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,722
    You want to stick with dew point data for the suction line.

    Look at how a blend works. At a given pressure, you start evaporating at the bubble point. This is the lower of the two readings given. In our case, that is 32F. As the refrigerant continues to boil at a constant pressure, the temperature actually rises to the dew point readings.

    This is why it is THEORETICALLY possible that your readings are accurate but, if they are, your compressor is in a WHOLE lot of trouble.

    I would start looking closely at the evaporator and what is going on there that is causing you to either not absorb heat or to overfeed refrigerant.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,392
    As was mentioned early on in this discussion, it's possible the compressor isn't pumping as it should. If the valves are bad and it's only pumping at 50% capacity, your TXV will be way oversized and tend to cause such a flooding condition.

    At this point, I usually check the compressor amp draw against the manufacturer's published performance data. Get the compressor model number, the actual supply voltage, the suction & discharge pressure and we can look it up. It's amp draw should be withing 10% of what the data says it should be or you have a bad pump.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    Quote Originally Posted by fr420 View Post
    Actual with a thermometer, and I know the numbers are confusing that's why I'm asking for help.
    Ok. I'm going to suggest you verify your gauges and thermometer are calibrated and correct. If they are then your problem is over my head. Would have to be there and put my hands on it.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    1,157
    I would recommend recovering your gas and starting with virgin refrigerant.

    Could be your gauges too.. Have you tried another set?

    Normally with that high of suction pressure your high side will be through the roof.

    So, it's either a bad compressor, bad gauges, or mixed gas.

    I would also check you equalizer line on your valve.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    1,157
    Whoops missed where you said no equalizer line... How old is the coil? No distributor right???

  7. #33
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    837
    Any large leaks on the system in the past? Maybe it's time for some virgin refrigerant.


    I would recover some refrigerant and check the saturation to make sure the refrigerat itself is good.
    This and the compressor efficiency test could save you a bunch of time in the long run.

    I pretty new to refrigeration but that is where I would start.

    Please post your findings when they are determined.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NorthWest
    Posts
    147
    Quote Originally Posted by Capz View Post
    Yea, thru the TXV equalizer but the SH would be way low measured at the compressor and way high measured at the evap but wouldn't one visually see this while troubleshooting?
    Here is a picture of what that looks like on RIFF case. Coil and distributor was clear case at 35*
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  9. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Savannah Ga.
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    So, you're now claiming a subcooled suction line?

    32F SCT (this is wrong, but I'll play along) with a 25 degree suction line?

    5 degrees suction subcooling?



    Your readings are wrong, friend.



    icexprt,

    I've seen suction/liquid heat exchangers blow out and leak through. Not very common to see that particular part on smaller equipment like this.
    Maybe I'm using the wrong term to describe the part I'm referring to.... Refrigeration Research calls it a "subcooling heat exchanger". I've attached a picture... I hope it works...first time posting a picture! I've seen them on even smaller walk-ins before.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,722
    Quote Originally Posted by icexprt View Post
    Maybe I'm using the wrong term to describe the part I'm referring to.... Refrigeration Research calls it a "subcooling heat exchanger". I've attached a picture... I hope it works...first time posting a picture! I've seen them on even smaller walk-ins before.
    Yeah, I knew what you were talking about.

    I've seen a few of them rupture before. Finding the first one is the worst.

    They don't do a lot of subcooling, really.

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Phila, PA
    Posts
    191
    Quote Originally Posted by icexprt View Post
    Maybe I'm using the wrong term to describe the part I'm referring to.... Refrigeration Research calls it a "subcooling heat exchanger". I've attached a picture... I hope it works...first time posting a picture! I've seen them on even smaller walk-ins before.
    Thanks for all your help guys and sorry I got a little pissy at times. The promblem was the the subcool heat exchanger!!!!

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,722
    Quote Originally Posted by fr420 View Post
    Thanks for all your help guys and sorry I got a little pissy at times. The promblem was the the subcool heat exchanger!!!!
    Good find.

    My first one took me 3 service calls over 2 days to find and correct.

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Phila, PA
    Posts
    191
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    You want to stick with dew point data for the suction line.

    Look at how a blend works. At a given pressure, you start evaporating at the bubble point. This is the lower of the two readings given. In our case, that is 32F. As the refrigerant continues to boil at a constant pressure, the temperature actually rises to the dew point readings.

    This is why it is THEORETICALLY possible that your readings are accurate but, if they are, your compressor is in a WHOLE lot of trouble.

    I would start looking closely at the evaporator and what is going on there that is causing you to either not absorb heat or to overfeed refrigerant.
    I understand exactly what your saying, but the condition I was having The dew point reading would give me a subcooled suction line, and the bubble point reading was only one that made sense because as we know now I was coming back straight liquid.

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