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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    8

    Anyone familiar with LG's flex mini-split products?

    I'm seriously considering going with LG's flex mini-split heat pump system. I really like the idea of have zone control with every room, and duct work is not feasible for the house in question. The reason I like LG's lineup over other brands I've researched is the aesthetics of the indoor units. However, I'm not willing to sacrifice performance over style (the same might not be so for my wife).

    The bottom line is, has anyone had any experience with LG?

    What I'm looking for in the system is efficiency and comfort. It will also need to be able to heat my entire house in the winter, and cool it in the summer. Vents are not possible. Without getting into Manual J-load calculations and system sizing, I would love to hear different opinions on other brands if you have them.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,688
    and why not do the load calcs and sizing and then get a whole house system?

    not sure if the ductless will heat 100% of the time in your climate ( you did not mention where you live).

    Really too little info provided to be very accurate. Why not ask local companies to give you their opinions?
    The Food Stamp Program, administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is proud to be distributing the greatest amount of free meals and stamps EVER.
    Meanwhile, the National Park Service, administered by the U.S. Department of the Interior, asks us to "Please Do Not Feed the Animals". Their stated reason for this policy "... the animals become dependent on handouts and will not learn to take care of themselves."
    from an excerpt by Paul Jacob in Sun City, AZ

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    6,731
    If you live in a cold climate Mitsubishi is the best bc they work at 100% capacity down to 14*F where others don't. Load calcs are a must whether its a central system or multiple minis.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    DC Metro Area (MD)
    Posts
    3,371
    Quote Originally Posted by jtrammel View Post
    If you live in a cold climate Mitsubishi is the best bc they work at 100% capacity down to 14*F where others don't. Load calcs are a must whether its a central system or multiple minis.
    Agreed. I recommend Mitsubishi ductless systems, as I have experience with them (not so much other brands). Their inverter ductless heat pumps are outstanding. As always, focus on finding the best contractor who will do quality work and size the equipment properly per Manual J. Then discuss equipment options with them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    8
    Sorry for the lack of information. I do plan on having companies come and do Manual J load calculations and quotes. Before I do that though, I wanted to settle on a brand in which I feel the most comfortable with (not all hvac businesses install all types of brands).

    But perhaps doing the load calculation first would be a better idea. That way I could find out exactly what I need, and compare the models of each brand which fall into my requirement.

    I do live in a climate which receives cold weather. Lows can get in the negatives (very rarely), and highs can hit over 100. Average lows are around 30 and average highs are around 80. I live near a very large lake, and humidity can sometimes be a problem during the warmer days. When the temperature falls below the efficient operating range, we have a wood-stove in the basement and two fireplaces we can use for alternative heat.

    You mentioned that your not sure if ductless would be able to heat my entire house, could you elaborate?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    8
    I really like the look of the indoor LG units, Can you use LG indoor units with the Mitsubishi outdoor unit? Or is this an industry no-no?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Pavilion, NY
    Posts
    2,121
    Mismatching manufacturers will not work. They communicate with each other and essentially speak different languages. I would also recommend Mitsubishi. If you are looking for them to perform below freezing,,, the hyper heat units are the way to go but they only come as single systems so you would need multiple systems. If they are primarily for cooling and supplemental heat then multi head units would be your choice.
    ...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by kangaroogod View Post
    If you are looking for them to perform below freezing,,, the hyper heat units are the way to go but they only come as single systems so you would need multiple systems. If they are primarily for cooling and supplemental heat then multi head units would be your choice.
    Are you saying the multi units (one outdoor, multiple indoor) are bad for whole house heating?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Pavilion, NY
    Posts
    2,121
    On a 20,000 btu multi head unit the actual heat output is 22,000btus at 47 degrees. It is only 12,500 btus at 17 degrees when you really need the heat. The hyper heat by comparison on the 18,000 btu unit with be 21,600 btus at 47/16 and 5 degrees. It maintains output whereas the multi do not
    ...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    8
    If I had my system sized for the 17 degree temperature, would it be over sized and cause humidity/short cycling at the higher temperatures?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Pavilion, NY
    Posts
    2,121
    Not really as the units fully modulate to match the load at higher temps
    ...

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