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  1. #14

    Confused battery question

    Several of you have mention the battery back up. My model won't light when the power is out. Is this because there is no back-up? Maybe no or dead batteries? I 've been suffering through the ice storm that slammed Missouri this past weekend. My power came back on, but we're expecting more winter weather this weekend. I've love to be able to light my fire, so to speak, if I need to. Thanks for you help.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,228

    Question Which model?

    Do you know your model #? Can you tell if it is IPI or DSI?

  3. #16
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,078
    if it is IPI there should be a black battery pack that take 2 "D" batteries. It would also have orange and green wires under there. If there is a giant grey module it is DSI which runs off 24v and has no batter backup.

  4. #17
    The model number is NB3630I and I have 2 switches on my wall, so I think it's an IPI. I do not have a pilot light that burns while not in use.

    I can't believe how fast the responses were. I really appreciate it.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,078
    if you have two switches then they prob wired it up wrong, one is to the jbox for power which should not be on a switch and the other is for flames. A NB is a B-vent version I think... yay... ugh I hate b-vent. Anyway..... yeah, if you dont have that battery back under there you would have to call the dealer and tell them you should have gotten one with the unit and its missing. It would be a black box with black and red wires coming off it.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2

    Heatilator ND3933I on a generator...

    Like Missouri Man, I too am in the ice storm. I have a Heatilator ND3933I which has the battery pack and works fine without power but of course the blower does not work. Can the blower be unplugged from the AC outlet located under the fireplace and plugged into a generator to activate the blower?

    There is an electrical outlet in the bottom vent with an AC/DC wallwart for the intellifire and a 3-prong plug that runs to the blower. Can I unplug this 3-prong plug and plug into an extension cord to my generator. And, would I also need to plug the wallwart into the generator or will it be fine on the battery pack?

    Thanks for any info. Cold here and more to come.

  7. #20
    AirData, do you have one switch or 2 to turn your fire on?

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    78
    pluging the fan into the generator will not affect the IPI system. The fan should come on right away.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by missouri man View Post
    AirData, do you have one switch or 2 to turn your fire on?
    I have one switch with the Intellifire electronic ignition system.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,078
    Quote Originally Posted by AirData View Post
    Like Missouri Man, I too am in the ice storm. I have a Heatilator ND3933I which has the battery pack and works fine without power but of course the blower does not work. Can the blower be unplugged from the AC outlet located under the fireplace and plugged into a generator to activate the blower?

    There is an electrical outlet in the bottom vent with an AC/DC wallwart for the intellifire and a 3-prong plug that runs to the blower. Can I unplug this 3-prong plug and plug into an extension cord to my generator. And, would I also need to plug the wallwart into the generator or will it be fine on the battery pack?

    Thanks for any info. Cold here and more to come.
    you could plug in just the fan to the generator it would operate as it did when you had power. The fan and IPI system are totally separate from each other. If you wanted you could also plug the transformer into the generate but make sure you take the batteries out first. With the transformer plugged it in backfeeds voltage into the battery pack and will make batteries start to leak over time.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    18
    we have just started with the ipi system here ,, i still recomend the standing pilot ,cold climate and spiderwebs seem to be the problems we have encountered with ipi,the newer standing pilot systems without all the high limits, presure relief switchs,mercury flame safety switches, limited amounts of wiring.have changed this business for the better,rarely do we have problems with the old system anymore.note the flame rods on the ipi system many times i have had to bend towards the pilot light and rough up the surface this seems to correct certain problems that have arrised ,anyone else had to do this

  12. #25
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    1,078
    yeah we have to tweak the sensor and igniter rods sometimes but not that often. The new pilots they are using now with only two toungues (instead of 3) work a lot better. The only way ever install a standing pilot unit anymore is if that's the only way you can get it (or the customer requests it which is rare). We usually sell the WSK-MLT or WSKXXX-HNG with the units so people can turn the pilot on in the winter time. One thing I love about the IPI system is that there is no Thermocouple or Thermopile to go bad. We should see a lot less service calls where the problem is "my fireplace turns off by itself".

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,228

    Cool IPI reliability?

    I have serviced (1) IPI so far this season--ONE. I do 5 calls per day.

    When cleaning the flame rod, you want to use fine steel wool or very fine emery cloth. Never use sand paper or anything that roughs the surface. A rough surface can lead to a loss of signal. The rough surface gives many points to attract positive ions to establish the bridge. Imagine the army trying to ford a wide river. Do the engineers build a bridge at the most narrow point? Sure, as long as it clearly protrudes out further than the other points of land and can support strong traffic (rectfication signal). Now, what if the shoreline has many points all projecting into the river about the same? The engineers wouldn't know which one to try for first and could easily make several vain attempts or get across only to find that pennisula doesn't lend itself to supporting traffic (signal). Thus, a rectification signal needs a clear path for only one signal. Remember, you're talking about a signal flowing only a millionth of one ampere or so, maybe less. You want the tip of the flame rod smooth and shiney.

    Using sand paper leaves residual grains of silica that, when heated, fuse together thereby making a glass insulative covering for the rod. This has been proven by the HVAC industry for yrs.

    As for the placement of the flame rod, unlike a thermocouple, the best location is near the mantel of the flame or near the outer edge--not in the heart of the flame. Remember, you are not using heat to generate power but rather using ions to conduct a signal. Go where the ions are.

    The PSE IPI pilot JTP spoke of recognized by the forked flame is much more reliable than the original Robertshaw pilot. This pilot was especially better at high altitudes and in wind. Since the ceramic insulator is vitreous, it isn't hygroscopic meaning it doesn't absorb moisture from the air, which can ground out the signal as with earlier Robertshaw pilots in humid conditions.

    Anyway, by the time we're all experts in IPI, we'll be learning ultraviolet flame proving instead.....

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