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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    2,911

    Acetylene explosion

    Saw pictures of a different one in school when a leaking tank was allowed to fill up a van and a remote was used to unlock the door...incredible damage to nearby homes.

    http://news.yahoo.com/video/bizarre-...210013113.html

    Here'the one I saw in school...

    http://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=...8&fr=fptb-yie8

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,326
    Always close the valve when finished. He probably had it rolling around in there too.
    Trying not to be a Hack.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    2,911
    I irritated a senior installer once by closing my valve when I was done outside and carted the rig inside. I don't trust the torch knobs for any length of time and keep the valve wrench poised to be slapped off in an instant.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,326
    I turn it off in between welds for many reasons.
    Trying not to be a Hack.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mid-Mo
    Posts
    3,422
    That's just scary.....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,326
    Ryan welcome to the discussion. You obviously don't have too much time on your hands like some, me.
    Trying not to be a Hack.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mid-Mo
    Posts
    3,422
    Seemed like you guys have it pretty well under control anyway. I haven't used my torch set in forever anyway!!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,326
    I heard that one anyways back to work.
    Trying not to be a Hack.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    937
    When working with Acetylene You need to know the "no no's", Ya know.
    Same with O2.
    And these gasses are not regulated.
    Not that I want them to be.
    Never argue with a crazy man.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Belize
    Posts
    24
    Any one heard of "redtek"? Its the HC (R12a) replacement for R134a . "Redtek" is not acetylene but its a hydrocarbon and it will fuel a fire. I wonder would happen if a vehicle charge with "redtek" had an evaporator leak , and someone press the remote to open the car?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta
    Posts
    1,010
    Quote Originally Posted by OStaine View Post
    Any one heard of "redtek"? Its the HC (R12a) replacement for R134a . "Redtek" is not acetylene but its a hydrocarbon and it will fuel a fire. I wonder would happen if a vehicle charge with "redtek" had an evaporator leak , and someone press the remote to open the car?
    Nothing.

    R-143a's replacement, HFO-1234yf is a flammable gas and has been proven to not be ignitable under even the most abnormal conditions.

    Redtek is perfectly safe, look it up.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Belize
    Posts
    24
    R-143a's replacement, HFO-1234yf is a flammable gas and has been proven to not be ignitable under even the most abnormal conditions.
    I've had some training and read some articles on this subject. There are strict guidelines concerning the application of hydrocarbon in supermarkets and there are strict guidelines to remove all SOI's (source of ignition) from inside RTU's that are to be retrofitted. These guidelines were expressly given because of safety issues. Here's a video that follows my argument. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=k0K1WPCWm2k
    Have you tried this with REDTEK?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    937
    http://www.redtek.com/techinfo.html

    This looks like a crime to me.
    SECTION 3 FIRE OR EXPLOSION HAZARD
    AUTO IGNITION TEMPERATURE: 1585 F
    FLASHPOINT: -34 C
    LOWER FLAMMABLE LIMIT (LEL): 1.9%
    UPPER FLAMMABLE LIMIT (UEL): 8.5%
    EXTINGUISH MEDIA: If possible, stop flow of gas. Use water to cool fire exposed tanks, surroundings and to protect personnel
    working on shutoff. Water spray, dry powder, or carbon dioxide can be directed at flame area to reduce fire intensity. Do not extinguish
    flames unless leak can be stopped.
    HAZARDOUS COMBUSTION PRODUCTS: Normal combustion forms oxides of carbon.
    SENSITIVITY TO STATIC DISCHARGE: Vapor may ignite if exposed to static discharge.
    EXPLOSION DATA: Sensitivity to impact. Mixture is not sensitivity.
    FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD: Flammable vapor may form if allowed to mix with air. Accumulation of gas is an ignition hazard.
    Vapors are heavier than air and may travel to an ignition source.
    Last edited by sweat hog; 01-30-2013 at 01:33 AM.
    Never argue with a crazy man.

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