Page 8 of 11 FirstFirst 1234567891011 LastLast
Results 92 to 104 of 137
  1. #92
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Quote Originally Posted by tiger man View Post
    You should have to be a proven tech capable of tackling anything, and repairing anything before you eventhink about selling systems. We let our customers decide when they are ready to buy a new system. Most of the customers have been with us for over fifteen years and leave keys or give us their garage code to get in the house when they are gone. They trust us completely, and if we wanted could probably sell a lot more systems than we do. I dont like to sell, and feel their is enough profit in repairs. I have put inducers, blower motors, and gas valves on funaces over twenty years old lately, just to get the customers heat immediately. An guess what they replace thevsystem anyway a year or two down the road. I cant stand salestechs

    x2
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  2. #93
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,224
    Quote Originally Posted by tiger man View Post
    You should have to be a proven tech capable of tackling anything, and repairing anything before you eventhink about selling systems. We let our customers decide when they are ready to buy a new system. Most of the customers have been with us for over fifteen years and leave keys or give us their garage code to get in the house when they are gone. They trust us completely, and if we wanted could probably sell a lot more systems than we do. I dont like to sell, and feel their is enough profit in repairs. I have put inducers, blower motors, and gas valves on funaces over twenty years old lately, just to get the customers heat immediately. An guess what they replace thevsystem anyway a year or two down the road. I cant stand salestechs


    No disrespect or insult intented, but mirrors must be a daily ordeal for you. We are all “sales techs.” What do you think you are doing every time you quote a repair and seek the customer’s approval for same? Did you hang a shingle out front that reads “No service charge, free parts and installation?” It just so happens that a malfunctioning component makes the repair an easy and anticipated sale. How many of you do NOT drive service trucks that state "Sales, Service and Installation?" Many of you probably have an "Ask Our Comfort Experts About Air Quality!!!"

    It’s case by case and always with that customer’s particular needs in mind. If that is your reference point, your clients will always be treated fairly and professionally.

    Why on earth should I need to know how to fix a deep fryer or ice machine in order to quote a 25 year old residential blower motor, while pointing out that the furnace has a 25 year old inducer, board and gas valve; and consideration towards replacing the system might be warranted before other major components fail? How proven do you have to be to change a blower motor? How much time and skill does it take to realize the board is not passing power to an inducer, ignitor or blower? How long does it take to replace a board? Child’s play…all of it.

    We are simply trained to do it safely and with a timely parts infrastructure. Granted, every once in a while we catch a weird one – but 90% of the time it’s pretty routine and does not require that much “proving.” However it should always demand consideration of the customer’s long term interests - not just our short term repair receipts and stoked pride because we made something really old rise from the dead.

    I don’t feel particularly smart, super skilled or experienced when I replace a thirty year old fan/limit switch in a grossly oversized and inefficient barn burner.. Conversely, I feel kind of silly. And responsible. My saving grace is always the knowledge that it was not my recommendation. I am a reasonably competent residential service tech. As such, it behooves me to inform my customers of all their options.

    Now…I know what you truly meant by “sales techs” and I assure you I am not. However, in some cases, repairing old equipment can be equally as irresponsible as replacing parts that don’t need to be replaced. I have never informed a customer that their equipment could not be fixed. Not even a grounded compressor or cracked heat exchanger. And nearly every single time they arrive at replacement before I do, knowing very well how old their system is…hearing the furnace slightly concussing on in the middle of the night, the condenser whining rhythmically for years.

    Balance. And ultimately, we will be the ones that determine whether there is balance or not.

  3. #94
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,911
    I have to differ with you, my friend.

    You are correct when you opine that a tech has to seek approval for a repair. But that is not what we are talking a bout, or, at least that is not what I am talking about.

    A "sales tech" is a guy with only rudimentary skills who is given a mandate to earn his pay by selling. That is what commission-base sales are all about. It's like being a car salesman. Sure, sometimes someone needs to buy a car, BUT, when you take your car in for service, the last thing you expect is to hear your mechanic say, "that car is ten years old. I have a new car available, and I can get you into it tomorrow."

    That's the difference.

    ...and it is who you work for that detemines where there will be balance, or only a sale.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  4. #95
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    270
    Quote Originally Posted by hurtinhvac View Post
    [/B]

    No disrespect or insult intented, but mirrors must be a daily ordeal for you. We are all “sales techs.” What do you think you are doing every time you quote a repair and seek the customer’s approval for same? Did you hang a shingle out front that reads “No service charge, free parts and installation?” It just so happens that a malfunctioning component makes the repair an easy and anticipated sale. How many of you do NOT drive service trucks that state "Sales, Service and Installation?" Many of you probably have an "Ask Our Comfort Experts About Air Quality!!!"

    It’s case by case and always with that customer’s particular needs in mind. If that is your reference point, your clients will always be treated fairly and professionally.

    Why on earth should I need to know how to fix a deep fryer or ice machine in order to quote a 25 year old residential blower motor, while pointing out that the furnace has a 25 year old inducer, board and gas valve; and consideration towards replacing the system might be warranted before other major components fail? How proven do you have to be to change a blower motor? How much time and skill does it take to realize the board is not passing power to an inducer, ignitor or blower? How long does it take to replace a board? Child’s play…all of it.

    We are simply trained to do it safely and with a timely parts infrastructure. Granted, every once in a while we catch a weird one – but 90% of the time it’s pretty routine and does not require that much “proving.” However it should always demand consideration of the customer’s long term interests - not just our short term repair receipts and stoked pride because we made something really old rise from the dead.

    I don’t feel particularly smart, super skilled or experienced when I replace a thirty year old fan/limit switch in a grossly oversized and inefficient barn burner.. Conversely, I feel kind of silly. And responsible. My saving grace is always the knowledge that it was not my recommendation. I am a reasonably competent residential service tech. As such, it behooves me to inform my customers of all their options.

    Now…I know what you truly meant by “sales techs” and I assure you I am not. However, in some cases, repairing old equipment can be equally as irresponsible as replacing parts that don’t need to be replaced. I have never informed a customer that their equipment could not be fixed. Not even a grounded compressor or cracked heat exchanger. And nearly every single time they arrive at replacement before I do, knowing very well how old their system is…hearing the furnace slightly concussing on in the middle of the night, the condenser whining rhythmically for years.

    Balance. And ultimately, we will be the ones that determine whether there is balance or not.
    Our vans just say 24 hour emergency service. And as far as parts go i just repair the furnace and tell the customer what parts were bad, no selling involved, no approval needed, just getbthe thing fixed and running like a top. If i feel the hsi needs to be replaced i just do it and ask questions later. Never been told by a customer that they dont want or need the hsi, or any other part for that matter. I dont have time to ask approval for every forty dollar part. Most of our customers are wealthy, and dont want to waste their time either discussing petty charges. We went to a customers house on thanksgiving day for a no heat on a furnace, replaced the bad relay,and noticed a sooted boiler ten feet away. He said i want it replaced. We said well give you a bid to replace the system, he said you dont understand, i dont care how much,you came out on thanksgiving day and got me heat, just put it in.

  5. #96
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    St. Louis
    Posts
    3,224
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    I have to differ with you, my friend.

    You are correct when you opine that a tech has to seek approval for a repair. But that is not what we are talking a bout, or, at least that is not what I am talking about.



    ...and it is who you work for that detemines where there will be balance, or only a sale.
    I do believe we are out of hairs to split, and I'll not attempt the atom; so I'll only quibble with this piece. I control who I work for.

    Which (appropriately, I believe) distills this issue to one of personal responsibility and individual integrity. I still believe most folks tends towards honesty, and will gravitate to a fair climate when able. So even though they might land at a sales culture outfit; they will either leave that environment when they feel adequately trained or, as in my case, simply resist it while still demonstrating a value to the organization simply by being a competent and honest tech. My boss will at times grudgingly admit that our customers respond quite favorably to my patient, realistic and thorough explanation of all their options. Without a doubt, in many instances he would have much preferred I left with a signed contract and down payment. As Tiger Man alludes to, when they are ready for new equipment they will call us and feel good about it.

  6. #97
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    17,911
    Quote Originally Posted by hurtinhvac View Post
    I do believe we are out of hairs to split, and I'll not attempt the atom; so I'll only quibble with this piece. I control who I work for.
    Who you work for is determined by who is AVAILABLE for you to work for. Out of that group of potential contractors, you then whittle it down to who has openings.

    Then you can work for the one that has an opening, IF you get hired.

    So, while what you said IS true, it is tempered by the reality of the employment relationship being a two-way street, ultimately controlled by the needs of the owner.

    Now, few of us can simply decide to not work until the employer with the correct moral/ethical business model has an opening, and decides that we might be the one who is the best hire.

    So, while balance IS possible, it is not truly within our own control, until WE become the owner.

    So, as employee techs, the balance is controlled by the person(s) for whom we labor. And for that reason, leadership in great service must come from the owners, and be influenced by us all.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  7. #98
    your so right.its not about time its about the quality and workmanship.i got a nephew who works for a big company in corpis tx their top tech gets $19.00 an hr but the company service rate is compatible to the north east union rates of $95. to $133. an hour wow talking about making a killing on labor.

  8. #99
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    256
    Quote Originally Posted by tiger man View Post
    you were a general laborer.
    Sort of. I was an apprentice for an 8 man residential light commercial union shop. Apprentices do what they're told.

  9. #100
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    256
    Quote Originally Posted by toocoolforschool View Post
    WOW!
    Excuse me while I get on my knees.
    If that's where you're comfortable.

  10. #101
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    East Coast FL
    Posts
    1,056
    Personally myself, do not care for these emerging nu skool resi and retail service organizations, who are concerned with regional dominance and never ending growth, more so than actually doing real air conditioning work.

    They are found with all sorts of techno fluff and sub contractors, instant electronic job reports complete with digital images, and global positioning based payroll.

    IMO, wrenches and oil go nicely with a service ticket hand written and even the occasional smudge. Kinda makes the customer feel like they are dealing with a genuine mechanic.

    Also, as others have said, the idea that one segment of our trade is superior to another, is ignorant and probably stated by someone suffering from a low self esteem. Whether a man cleans window shakers at seedy hotels, keeps ice cream cabinets running steady, overhauls industrial machinery, or makes people comfortable in their homes, they are all a part of our industry and respectable jobs.

    I say the really good tradesmen are the ones who do their best on every job, and won't discount one because it lacks flash and profile.

  11. #102
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    270
    Quote Originally Posted by TheChillerMan View Post
    Sort of. I was an apprentice for an 8 man residential light commercial union shop. Apprentices do what they're told.
    Did you ever do resi service only? I too, would be very bored with resi install. I like to diagnose and fix things not run duct and install. In th past ive helped out install for a few hours but couldnt stay focused.

  12. #103
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Quote Originally Posted by n.e.techjim View Post
    your so right.its not about time its about the quality and workmanship.i got a nephew who works for a big company in corpis tx their top tech gets $19.00 an hr but the company service rate is compatible to the north east union rates of $95. to $133. an hour wow talking about making a killing on labor.
    If you understood the costs of running an HVAC business, you would realize they are not really "making a killing on labor."
    A legit company with $20/hr technicians billing $100/hr for repairs wouldn't be able to keep its doors open without the markup on the parts associated with those $100/hr repairs.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  13. #104
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    656
    Agreed. Companys gotta pay for gas, auto insurance, maintance on that fleet, liability insurance for the business, lights, water, phones, and other little things that pop up

Page 8 of 11 FirstFirst 1234567891011 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event