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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Woodbridge Twp, NJ
    Posts
    1,308
    Sorry, but putting in a commsion for selling crap the customer doesnt need is just an easy way to turn your tech into a parts changer and get your business a reputation for being a hustler. We dont upsell stuff the job doesnt need. If the customer complains about turning the thermostat to different temperatures all day (while youre there fixing something else) and they have a T87, then absolutely suggest a programmable. But dont go in there with the mindset you are going to sell them the world, and dont make your techs do it either!
    Someone mentioned a fan motor when replacing a capacitor. thats not upselling in my opinion. Thats being thorough and making sure the unit is fixed for good. If you fix it once and its done, then you will be referred and you will get more business. If you want to take the customer for all theyre worth, that will be the last time they ever speak your name without putting some choice words in front of it.

    Look at each customer as your own parents. Would you do to them what youre expecting your workers to do? NO? Then why are you doing it to someone elses?
    Every customer you take for granted today will be someone else's tomorrow.

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,077
    I see conversations on here about being fast on a service call. Fast. Get it Done. Hurry. Hurry.

    It's wrong. This is not a production line in an auto plant. Technicians are being raised these days in this environment of hurry up, get it done, hurry hurry. And where has it gotten the trade? One could argue nowhere.

    Fix it right the first time, what ever it takes. If your leadership and culture are right, and there is accountability for performance ( is it fixed right ), you won't need all this other stupid bull.

    It's shameful what residential contractors have turned the trade into at that level. Light Commercial fast approaching that.

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,777
    Quote Originally Posted by Dowadudda View Post
    I see conversations on here about being fast on a service call. Fast. Get it Done. Hurry. Hurry.

    It's wrong. This is not a production line in an auto plant. Technicians are being raised these days in this environment of hurry up, get it done, hurry hurry. And where has it gotten the trade? One could argue nowhere.

    Fix it right the first time, what ever it takes. If your leadership and culture are right, and there is accountability for performance ( is it fixed right ), you won't need all this other stupid bull.

    It's shameful what residential contractors have turned the trade into at that level. Light Commercial fast approaching that.
    I fought that mentality and WON.

    Our area had devolved into the run, run, run mindset an it was killing us.

    I slowed down, did it RIGHT and the service calls started drying up.

    It's great, now. Yeah, stuff still breaks, but not nearly as often.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Western KY
    Posts
    1,221
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    I fought that mentality and WON.

    Our area had devolved into the run, run, run mindset an it was killing us.

    I slowed down, did it RIGHT and the service calls started drying up.

    It's great, now. Yeah, stuff still breaks, but not nearly as often.
    Steady all year is better then feast or famine.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Central NJ Area
    Posts
    837
    Looking for a Tech in Central NJ for mostly residential work.

    PM meet for more information.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,777

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Sherman, TX
    Posts
    9,441
    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy knocker View Post
    Steady all year is better then feast or famine.
    That's certainly true in the reefer world, but in places like Texas, HVAC IS seasonal, and I don't care who you are or HOW you run your business....that's the way it is.

    If you're working 40 in the winter, you'll be hustling 60+ in the summer. If you pull 40 in the summer, you're gonna be eatin' Ramen Noodles during winter.
    Technical incompetence is NOT a sales tool....

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,777
    Quote Originally Posted by John Markl View Post
    That's certainly true in the reefer world, but in places like Texas, HVAC IS seasonal, and I don't care who you are or HOW you run your business....that's the way it is.

    If you're working 40 in the winter, you'll be hustling 60+ in the summer. If you pull 40 in the summer, you're gonna be eatin' Ramen Noodles during winter.
    It's true of HVAC almost everywhere.

    In Western PA, AC is summertime, windows are open in spring and fall and heating calls in the winter.

    I'm happy to be a refer guy and pull 40 year 'round.

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    east kansas
    Posts
    8,033
    Quote Originally Posted by John Markl View Post
    That's certainly true in the reefer world, but in places like Texas, HVAC IS seasonal, and I don't care who you are or HOW you run your business....that's the way it is.

    If you're working 40 in the winter, you'll be hustling 60+ in the summer. If you pull 40 in the summer, you're gonna be eatin' Ramen Noodles during winter.
    I'm glad you put this in writing. Some people, business owners, need a refresher course.

    I'll take care of you in the summer. You need to be there in the winter for me. If not, don't count on me next summer.
    Beware of advice given by some guy on the Internet.

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    18,842
    Quote Originally Posted by robinair View Post
    We are looking for a few good men , if you are tired of being layed off in November and re-hired in March we are the Company to work for .We are located in the Katy Area and service Katy and N/W Houston .
    The right candidates will have great communication skills , be skilled in Residential service , be EPA Certified , Registered with the state , R410A certified and competant with newer high SEER A/C systems ,
    The candidate MUST have the desire to earn in excess of $80K per year . We hold a BBB A Plus rating and BBB award winner 3 years running.we are building a new shop and growing ,
    Background check required Drug test required Clean driving record mandatory
    Skill testing required.
    HIRING TECHS WITH 2 TO 10 PLUS YEARS OF EXPERIENCE , PAY HOURLY FROM $16 TO $25 PER HOUR PLUS COMMISSION FROM 3 % TO 5 % OF INVOICE TOTAL ( EQUIPMENT SALES OR SERVICE SALES ) BE PREPARED TO EARN FROM $ 40, 000.00 TO $100,000.00 PER YEAR .( If you are happy making less than $ 40,000.00 a year please do not apply for this position .)
    Feel safe and secure driving a newer full size Van , be prepared to work in a high stress environment , wear company uniform , On call schedule which will require weekend work on rotation ,
    Extensive Technical and sales Training by industry leaders
    BENIFITS
    1) Aetna insurance ( we pay 50 % of your premium )
    3) Dental available
    4) Life insurance available
    5) Vision insurance available
    6) Tool purchase plan , any industry related tools that you need we will buy for you and you can pay back via payroll deduction
    7) Training provided by leading industry experts weekly
    8) Company smart phone with 2 way radio provided
    9) We provide full uniform
    10) You are covered by workmans comp insurance
    11) Year End bonus
    Call Leonard now at 832 493 3456 Or Email to robinair@sbcglobal.net

    Okay, I hope my response can shed some light for you.

    I am already playing for another team (in PA) and I am beyond the draft. That said, for an experienced tech, I believe your base pay is low, and a high stress environment based on sales is not a technician job. It's a sales job. Been there, done that.

    Not long ago, I had an interview with another commercial company. I met all of their requirements, and then some. Background check, PA child safety cert, the whole nine yards, since they do work in schools. They asked me what I expected in money, and my response was in line with what I had been told by others is indeed within the company pay scale.

    I received a nice boilerplate email about how they will continue their search. One friend thinks it is age discrimination. I can't tell.

    What I can tell you is this: the guys who really see themselves as techs generally work in the commercial environment, and the ones who want to make money selling humidifiers to old ladies work in residential. There are some few companies who are exceptions, I'm sure.

    During my interview, the subject of future employees, 10 or 15 years from now, came up. We agreed that there would be very few guys who will want to do the work we do. Some call that a "shortage." It is not.

    In aviation, they often talk about a "pilot shortage," as if there will not be enough folks able to fly airplanes. That is not true, and the truth applies equally to HVAC.

    You see there is never a shortage of workers.

    The IS a shortage of workers who are willing to do the job for the pay being offered to work under those circumstances.

    Right now, you have an ad posting that extends far beyond your local area, in an effort to recruit workers. My position is that if a company offers the right pay for the job and working conditions there is NEVER a shortage of workers!!

    So, 10 or 15 years down the road, we will see 80% immigrants doing trades work, for perhaps ONE generation at the most, and their children, like the children of today, will realize that they can make just as much money writing apps for the iPhone as they can spending 50 hours a week in attics and crawl spaces, and the guys that like to diagnose and fix, instead of sell, sell, sell will be working in commercial, and looking to leave retail or residential behind them. Like me.

    I hope that helps to give you a new perspective.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  11. #50
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    1,355
    Quote Originally Posted by TheChillerMan View Post
    That sounds horrible. I'm so glad I stopped doing residential work when I was a fourth year apprentice!
    My thoughts EXACTLY!!! And I stopped doing residential before I ever joined the union!
    Saving the world...one service call at a time.

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    1,355
    Quote Originally Posted by timebuilder View Post
    Okay, I hope my response can shed some light for you.

    I am already playing for another team (in PA) and I am beyond the draft. That said, for an experienced tech, I believe your base pay is low, and a high stress environment based on sales is not a technician job. It's a sales job. Been there, done that.

    Not long ago, I had an interview with another commercial company. I met all of their requirements, and then some. Background check, PA child safety cert, the whole nine yards, since they do work in schools. They asked me what I expected in money, and my response was in line with what I had been told by others is indeed within the company pay scale.

    I received a nice boilerplate email about how they will continue their search. One friend thinks it is age discrimination. I can't tell.

    What I can tell you is this: the guys who really see themselves as techs generally work in the commercial environment, and the ones who want to make money selling humidifiers to old ladies work in residential. There are some few companies who are exceptions, I'm sure.During my interview, the subject of future employees, 10 or 15 years from now, came up. We agreed that there would be very few guys who will want to do the work we do. Some call that a "shortage." It is not.

    In aviation, they often talk about a "pilot shortage," as if there will not be enough folks able to fly airplanes. That is not true, and the truth applies equally to HVAC.

    You see there is never a shortage of workers.

    The IS a shortage of workers who are willing to do the job for the pay being offered to work under those circumstances.

    Right now, you have an ad posting that extends far beyond your local area, in an effort to recruit workers. My position is that if a company offers the right pay for the job and working conditions there is NEVER a shortage of workers!!

    So, 10 or 15 years down the road, we will see 80% immigrants doing trades work, for perhaps ONE generation at the most, and their children, like the children of today, will realize that they can make just as much money writing apps for the iPhone as they can spending 50 hours a week in attics and crawl spaces, and the guys that like to diagnose and fix, instead of sell, sell, sell will be working in commercial, and looking to leave retail or residential behind them. Like me.

    I hope that helps to give you a new perspective.
    Great line! But i've been skewered by a few resi guys here as being an "arrogant commercial guy" for stating basically the same thing. We'll see what happens here.
    Saving the world...one service call at a time.

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    southern ohio
    Posts
    43
    start one in Ohio.

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