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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,698
    [QUOTE=clllclal;15033881]George2

    What exactly is a fresh air intake? Also, what size dehumidifier would I need?(not the whole house type, just one you sit on the floor) The living area of the the home is 2200sf.

    Thanks

    The cheapest and easiest way (for fresh air) is to run a 6" or 7" pipe from the outside directly into the return air duct. I live in the midwest and I assume that your humidity varies greatly from ours but I had a customer that had tightened his home and developed excess humidity. I mean it was dripping like I had never seen.

    I told him to try the "simple" fresh air method and I have to say it worked like a charm. Every time he sees me he can not stop talking about the difference that it has made. He's a customer for life!

  2. #15
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    south louisiana
    Posts
    3,188
    no pricing here OP.

    stvc...high humidity does just happen. right now it is 55 degrees and 59% Rh outside.
    inside temp is 65 degrees % Rh is 64%.
    no heat for the past few days...its been nice outside.
    turned off heat & april aire system.

    OP..don't add a fresh air intake to the return unless you need it, otherwise you
    are introducing more RH into the house. the most I've ever added was a 4"
    duct with a barometric damper to open only when the house enters a negative
    pressure. introducing the air that a 6 or 7" duct will move...is a lot. esp if it is open
    all the time.

    try the stand alone for a while. run it year round. see what results you get.
    then invest in whole house system.

    check your return air, r/a leaks contribute to high indoor Rh.

    best of luck
    The cure of the part should not be attempted without the cure of the whole. ~Plato

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Arnold mo
    Posts
    3,967
    What kind of water heater do you have? Natural draft?
    An answer without a question is meaningless.
    Information without understanding is useless.
    You can lead a horse to water............
    http://www.mohomeenergyaudits.com

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    So. NH
    Posts
    746
    Quote Originally Posted by clllclal View Post
    Thanks for all the replies. As for the first question, I do not have any fresh air ventilation system. As for the second question, I am built on a slab, so no crawlspace or basement. Also, as I stated in my original post, it seems that when the heater kicks on, the humidity in the house shoots up all of a sudden. I just don't understand this. How much does the ultra-aire 70h cost and how much would it cost to have it installed? Thanks again, everyone.

    Chad
    From what inside/outside temp and humidity are you raising the inside temp when the heat turns on? A sudden surge is not normal in my heating climate.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    49
    As I stated in my OP, for some reason the humidity in my house just seemed way too high. We always turn on the exhaust fans when showering and also while cooking. With the time of year it is the A/C is not running, so no dehumidifying effect. I went to my local Lowe's yesterday and purchased a 50 pint dehumidifier. After only running it for a few hours, the humidity level on my Trane tstat was down to about 47%. It was pretty chilly last night and I had the heat set at 69 degrees and when I woke this morning, no fogged windows and they were also dry. I have dumped a couple of full buckets of water out of that thing. If it is just as simple as running the dehumidifier for a few hours during the day, I'll take that. Otherwise, I just wish I knew why the humidity level in my house is so high. I know I said it was new construction, but it has already been a little over a year. Thanks everyone for your input in this matter.

    Chad

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Arnold mo
    Posts
    3,967
    What kind of water heater do you have? One with a metal flue and a draft diverter?
    An answer without a question is meaningless.
    Information without understanding is useless.
    You can lead a horse to water............
    http://www.mohomeenergyaudits.com

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    49
    Quote Originally Posted by tipsrfine View Post
    What kind of water heater do you have? One with a metal flue and a draft diverter?
    Actually, I have 2 hot water heaters. Both of them are in the attic.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    south louisiana
    Posts
    3,188
    glad to know that the stand alone dehumfidier is working to reduce the condensation
    & lower the house's RH. 47% is pretty good for stand alone dehumidifier.

    I'd recommend that you run it full time in the summer to allow you to
    set tstat at higher setting. by removing the RH in the house, the a/c
    will feel cooler.

    shutting the dehmidifier off will allow RH to build up again.
    try to find the balance that works for you in the winter.
    come summer the needs will change.

    I've recommended stand alone dehmidifiers for years.
    having just made the jump to whole house dehumidifier
    for my own home gives me a wider perspective on these systems.

    if you are pleased with the additional dehumidification...
    look into whole house dehumidifiers. no dumping buckets!

    best of luck.
    The cure of the part should not be attempted without the cure of the whole. ~Plato

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Arnold mo
    Posts
    3,967
    Quote Originally Posted by clllclal View Post
    Actually, I have 2 hot water heaters. Both of them are in the attic.
    My question was in regards to possible flue gases being drawn into your conditioned living area. You don't seem too concerned, so I'll stop.
    An answer without a question is meaningless.
    Information without understanding is useless.
    You can lead a horse to water............
    http://www.mohomeenergyaudits.com

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    49
    Quote Originally Posted by tipsrfine View Post
    My question was in regards to possible flue gases being drawn into your conditioned living area. You don't seem too concerned, so I'll stop.
    I guess I didn't understand what you were asking. Trust me, any advice that I am receiving right about now is much appreciated.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    49
    Quote Originally Posted by energy_rater_La View Post
    glad to know that the stand alone dehumfidier is working to reduce the condensation
    & lower the house's RH. 47% is pretty good for stand alone dehumidifier.

    I'd recommend that you run it full time in the summer to allow you to
    set tstat at higher setting. by removing the RH in the house, the a/c
    will feel cooler.

    shutting the dehmidifier off will allow RH to build up again.
    try to find the balance that works for you in the winter.
    come summer the needs will change.

    I've recommended stand alone dehmidifiers for years.
    having just made the jump to whole house dehumidifier
    for my own home gives me a wider perspective on these systems.

    if you are pleased with the additional dehumidification...
    look into whole house dehumidifiers. no dumping buckets!

    best of luck.
    Thanks for the reply. I am very interested in one of the whole house dehumidifier. I just don't know which one is better than any of the other machines. Also, I don't know what they cost and how much it is to have one installed.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    south louisiana
    Posts
    3,188
    Can't help you with pricing.
    you can contact the mfg for someone in your area.
    google ultra aire dehumidifier

    best of luck
    The cure of the part should not be attempted without the cure of the whole. ~Plato

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,444
    Quote Originally Posted by clllclal View Post
    Thanks for the reply. I am very interested in one of the whole house dehumidifier. I just don't know which one is better than any of the other machines. Also, I don't know what they cost and how much it is to have one installed.
    During cold weather with low outdoor dew points (<50^F), adequate fresh air change should maintain low inside humidity. Therefore a damp home during cold weather indicates inadeauate fresh air ventilation to purge indoor air pollutants and renew oxygen. As weather warms, fresh air infiltration, decreases. Fresh air ventilation is basic in any home when occupied.
    Yes, a dehumidifier is necessary when the outdoor dew points are +55^F to maintain <50%RH inside during low/no cooling load conditions.
    Ultra-Aires are the grand daddy of whole house dehumidifiers with the best air filters, lowest electrical usage (highest Energy Star rating) and most durable.
    I have worked for Ultra-Aire for 20 years. These are priced on the high end. Any distributor or contractor can order a unit from 800 533 7533.
    Thanks for the support.
    Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

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