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  1. #1
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    Draft Regulator ?

    I had my oil furnace tuned and cleaned, they found the breech draft to be -14 and the overfire draft to be -8. Do you think I should have a draft regulator installed? Thank you in advance.

  2. #2
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    All oil burners should have a barometric damper

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joehvac25 View Post
    All oil burners should have a barometric damper
    Absolutely! The FIRST thing you do when setting up an oil burner is adjust the draft! Every install manual I have seen for oil appliances state that a barometric damper/draft regulator are REQUIRED. About those numbers, did you mean -0.14 and -0.08? Most units want -.01 to -.02" over fire and -.02 to -.04" at the breach, although there are some that operate ant a positive pressure over fire. That large of a difference between over fire and breach draft usually means a partially plugged heat exchanger. Did the tech remove the cleanouts and flue pipe to inspect the inner HX passages? I'm thinking not.
    Where are you? Are you done yet? I got ONE more call for you.....

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCBeav13 View Post
    I had my oil furnace tuned and cleaned, they found the breech draft to be -14 and the overfire draft to be -8. Do you think I should have a draft regulator installed? Thank you in advance.
    This is a job for an experienced oil furnace technician; no tinkering by anyone else.

    Way too much draft; Not an efficient situation.

    What temp was the flue gas? ________

    The barometric damper (that it must have) comes shipped with the weight on the right side for vertical flue pipes; if it's a horizontal pipe switch the weight to the left side. [/B]

    I defer to the gasguy post above! Also, I agree, may not have properly cleaned the HX passages.

  5. #5
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    I believe the measurements were done in pascals (pa) and not inches of water column (inwc), not completely sure about this though. So I believe the conversion would be...
    Breech Draft would be -0.056
    Overfire Draft would be -0.032

    Not sure what you mean by HX passage?
    Sorry I am just starting to learn about my oil furnance (first time as a homeowner)

    Here are some other measurements from the report sheet if that helps...Net Stack 522, CO2 10.9, O2 6.5, Smoke 0, Efficiency 82.2%, CO Reading 39, Fuel Pump 100 psi, Safety timing 45 sec, and water 1/2 in.

    Just to give you an idea about the oil furnace it is a York (1988), forced air w/ Beckett.

    Thanks again for all your help. I am pretty sure I need the barometric damper, I am just looking for some other opinions as well.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by HCBeav13 View Post
    I believe the measurements were done in pascals (pa) and not inches of water column (inwc), not completely sure about this though. So I believe the conversion would be...
    Breech Draft would be -0.056
    Overfire Draft would be -0.032

    Not sure what you mean by HX passage?
    Sorry I am just starting to learn about my oil furnance (first time as a homeowner)

    Here are some other measurements from the report sheet if that helps...Net Stack 522, CO2 10.9, O2 6.5, Smoke 0, Efficiency 82.2%, CO Reading 39, Fuel Pump 100 psi, Safety timing 45 sec, and water 1/2 in.

    Just to give you an idea about the oil furnace it is a York (1988), forced air w/ Beckett.

    Thanks again for all your help. I am pretty sure I need the barometric damper, I am just looking for some other opinions as well.
    Well, that changes everything & looks more like it.

    HX, or HT-EX, is short for 'heat exchanger' - passages.
    He may have done a good job cleaning HX passages.

    Without a barometric damper the wind levels & outdoor temperature differentials will affect the draft of the burner too much.

    Keep that service data in a safe place to be used during the next service.

  7. #7
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    Feb 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joehvac25 View Post
    All oil burners should have a barometric damper
    if you have a poo. pressure boiler, would this still allow it to stay positive? i may try it at my own house as a test. i have many,many biasi b10 boilers out there. not one has a problem. biasi must spec no barro for a reason right? is it because of it not being a neg. system?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by snupytcb View Post
    if you have a poo. pressure boiler, would this still allow it to stay positive? i may try it at my own house as a test. i have many,many biasi b10 boilers out there. not one has a problem. biasi must spec no barro for a reason right? is it because of it not being a neg. system?
    I found this and it shows baros, http://www.qhtinc.com/wp/wp-content/...ual-081312.pdf

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joehvac25 View Post
    It does show to install one if needed because it is a positive pressure boiler. Most cases do not require. Of course I may have just been lucky all these years.lol. But I doubt it, black clouds don't carry good luck. My cloud is hanging tight to me today, I went to bring my dump truck home and it is buried in the mud. And now has a blown break line. Damn this black cloud.lol.

  10. #10
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    Lol I didn't really read the manual just looked at the pics, I've never seen one of them boilers so can't say for sure. Sounds like your having a lovely day, if it were here it would be froze in the mud, reminds me of the time I had a Toyota pickup with 38"s and 5:29s, went out to my deer blind through a mud hole and later when I left my drums were frozen solid and stripped half the ring gear off In the rear. That's what 4 low and lockers front and rear does I guess lol.

  11. #11
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    If you are correct in your units of measure, then that is a lot better. Still a tad on the high side, but not too bad. Might be able to get a bit better efficiency yet. Did they check the temperature rise? The heat exchanger (HX) usually has a couple of removable cleanout ports as well as removing the flue pipe to remove soot buildup from the inside surfaces. Soot is a great insulator. A 1/8" layer of soot is equal to 1"+ of fiberglass insulation. This seriously restricts heat transfer & reduces efficiency. At that age make sure they check the heat exchanger well at each service.
    Where are you? Are you done yet? I got ONE more call for you.....

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