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  1. #1
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    N4 Supervisor and fiber

    I'm looking for any documentation on connecting jaces to a supervisor over fiber. The network protocol will be BACnet. Is this possible?
    "Controls is a lifestyle not a job" -klrogers

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by dapper View Post
    I'm looking for any documentation on connecting jaces to a supervisor over fiber. The network protocol will be BACnet. Is this possible?
    Contemporary controls has ethernet to fiber switches. Not sure why you would bother with anything other than just a standard IP network, then run whatever protocols you need over that.

    Must say, I really hate all things fiber.
    Propagating the formula. http://www.noagendashow.com/

  3. #3
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    Check out Optigo Networks:
    https://www.optigo.net/

  4. #4
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    Just use some copper to fiber converters. It's just an IP network as far as everything is concerned.
    Scott Jalbert
    WebCTRL ninja
    AX and Smartstruxure newb

    The S in IoT stands for Security

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by asdf;ljk View Post
    Check out Optigo Networks:
    https://www.optigo.net/
    Ditto. If you want to string out a fiber backbone, they seem to have some slick stuff. It gets pretty pricey though.

    Think you would need more than just BMS on the network to justify the cost.
    Propagating the formula. http://www.noagendashow.com/

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  7. #6
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    Thread Starter
    The thought was to use fiber because the project consists of a few buildings that are several hundred feet apart each and connected by underground tunnels. I'd guestimate that there would be at least 500' to 600' between Jaces. Currently there is no electrical in the tunnels to power extenders or repeaters etc.
    "Controls is a lifestyle not a job" -klrogers

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  9. #7
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    I think your biggest cost is the fiber itself and putting ends on it. Not cheap.
    Scott Jalbert
    WebCTRL ninja
    AX and Smartstruxure newb

    The S in IoT stands for Security

  10. #8
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    Patch cords are pretty costly as well. Converting from one ahole style of connector to another.

    Its fragile as hell. Normal BMS installers can be counted on for a break or two on a project. Demo crew...better mark it well enough a blind man can spot it. Someone will still be hanging on it in the ceiling trying to get to XYZ which is just out of reach.

    All ends really need to be properly cleaned before you ram them into the switches. Dust can easily scratch the optics in the connections. This itself can kill a switch/SFP module or cause intermittent issues that plague you for months.

    The crap shouldn't be mixed in with other cables to protect it. They sell armored fiber cable, but that's $$$$ and its still fragile loose fibers at the terminations. Seeing lose fibers buried in the back of panduit packed with cables....bad, bad idea. How quick can you patch together copper vs fiber as well?

    Unless its a distance/bandwidth issue, not a fan of it. Pulled about a 1/4 mile of it out this summer and replaced with copper on a current project. Renovating everything in phases and the damn fibers kept breaking. Old fiber was not redundant so each break would drop large portions of the building. Working on switching to RSTP on everything, each panel will connect directly to 3-4 others. Pretty much a honeycomb layout. Fly a plane into the building, and it should still be communicating.
    Propagating the formula. http://www.noagendashow.com/

  11. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dapper View Post
    no electrical in the tunnels to power extenders or repeaters etc.
    Pretty much the perfect app for it. Eliminates the hassles of surges and other electrical nonsense when interconnecting buildings as well.
    Propagating the formula. http://www.noagendashow.com/

  12. #10
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    TP-Link makes pretty good fiber to ethernet converters, had very good success with these where I had an application exactly like yours.
    https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-Ether.../dp/B003AVRLZI

    best practice would be to also ensure all switches/routers upstream or downstream support the same bit rating.

    good luck

  13. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by amigo View Post
    TP-Link makes pretty good fiber to ethernet converters, had very good success with these where I had an application exactly like yours.
    https://www.amazon.com/TP-Link-Ether.../dp/B003AVRLZI

    best practice would be to also ensure all switches/routers upstream or downstream support the same bit rating.

    good luck
    Have use that, or at least something that looked exactly like that and it worked perfect. The only catch on those is the network ports are ONLY 1000bt. They won't link to anything 100bt or slower. So if the device being connected is slower just stick a little gig switch in there.
    Scott Jalbert
    WebCTRL ninja
    AX and Smartstruxure newb

    The S in IoT stands for Security

  14. #12
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    Thread Starter
    I'll look into the cost of installing myself. I may just ask the electrician on the job to run the fiber for me if the cost seems to prohibitive.
    "Controls is a lifestyle not a job" -klrogers

  15. #13
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    We have had excellent success with the Optigo line, paired with Clearfield accessories - we use pre-fabbed MPO cables for the long-runs (no need to learn how to splice fiber, or tool up for that chore - follow the rules for bends (ours is always in conduit), and carry the right cleaners with you), and use a Clearfield cassette to break the MPO out into individual fibers for connection to our 24-port and 16-port Optigo switches. It's expensive, and mentally a bit of a departure to learn that side of things over and above our regular controls wiring, but it seems a natural progression to all the IP stuff we've had to learn as part of controls.

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