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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    166

    Stationary Engineer's Exam

    I have posted a few times on this forum with questions on various topics, so I thought this would be the appropriate place to ask this question.

    First let me begin by stating that I am currently a senior in high school who takes a great interest in the field of building engineering. I am currently exploring this field as a possible career opportunity after graduation in May.

    I have toured several properties in my area, and have even done an apprenticeship. That being said I am fascinated by the mechanical workings of a building. I take equal interest in the daily variety of service calls undertaken by a crew of building engineers at a property.

    Upon researching education requirements for this field, I discovered that many companies require a; "Stationary Engineer's License" before they would even consider hiring someone.

    My question for readers of this forum is this: What can someone my age do to familiarize themselves with the basics of stationary engineering? I realize one must be at least 21 before they can even begin to think about taking the test, however I believe that getting a head start in studying would be a good idea.

    Does anyone know of any textbooks or websites that would be helpful for someone with my aspirations? What would be the best course of action to further my education in this area after high school?

    For additional info about myself: I might add that I have a basic understanding of the mechanical components of a building such as; chillers, air handling units, boilers, etc. Right now I am trying to learn the basics of this field. I would like the make the right decision regarding my education after high school.

    Thank you in advance for your time and interest in answering my questions.

    Best.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    166
    I forgot to add that this license is also required for Central Plant operators. I however want to get into building engineering after I graduate. If the possibility presented itself perhaps I could look into the position of Central Plant operator someday!

    Thanks again for any and all help!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Winnipeg MB Canada
    Posts
    354
    You don't have where you live in your profile, but if you were in Manitoba Canada, you could take a course after high school through the community collage to get a certificate as a entry level stationary Engineer.

    http://me.rrc.mb.ca/Catalogue/Progra...&RegionCode=GC

    If you live some place else in Canada you can find training schools here. http://www.nipe.ca/education.html

    If your in the US try looking on line at your local community collage or tech school. There may also be distance training offered.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    166
    Quote Originally Posted by mbhydro View Post
    You don't have where you live in your profile, but if you were in Manitoba Canada, you could take a course after high school through the community collage to get a certificate as a entry level stationary Engineer.

    http://me.rrc.mb.ca/Catalogue/Progra...&RegionCode=GC

    If you live some place else in Canada you can find training schools here. http://www.nipe.ca/education.html

    If your in the US try looking on line at your local community collage or tech school. There may also be distance training offered.
    Thanks for your reply. I'm in Texas. Down here the Unions do not manage this field, as they do up north. One benefit of the unions in places such as Chicago and New York is that they appear to help young people, such as myself, get into this field through long term apprenticeships.

    Thanks again. All advice is appreciated.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    166
    I have read that some buildings maintain 24 hour shifts of building engineers at their property. Does anyone know what the reasoning behind this is? Where I live this does not occur. However it seems to be a fairly common staffing trend up north.

    I have also heard that a building with a steam boiler must have an engineer on site 24/7. Does anyone know what the reasons for this are?

    Thanks for your input and advice.

    Best.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Houston area
    Posts
    1,493
    We have engineers, operators and maintenance people on staff 24/7 but then again we have over 20,000 tons of refrigeration and enough steam to heat half of Houston. If something goes wrong, and it does, you simply have to have experienced staffers at hand.
    The picture in my avatar is of the Houston Ship Channel and was taken from my backyard. I like to sit outside and slap mosquitos while watching countless supertankers, barges and cargo ships of every shape and size carry all sorts of deadly toxins to and fro. It's really beautiful at times.....just don't eat the three eyed fish....

    `. .` .>(((>

    `... `. .` .>(((>

    .` .>(((>

    LMAOSHMSFOAIDMT

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    166
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooked View Post
    We have engineers, operators and maintenance people on staff 24/7 but then again we have over 20,000 tons of refrigeration and enough steam to heat half of Houston. If something goes wrong, and it does, you simply have to have experienced staffers at hand.

    Is that Greenway Plaza? I have read that they have separate engineering departments. One that handles the house calls throughout the complex and another that maintains a central plant that services all buildings.

    Thanks for posting. I appreciate all input.

    Best.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Houston area
    Posts
    1,493
    No, I'm several miles from Greenway Plaza in the heart of the TMC (Texas Medical Center). The city of Houston requires all sorts of certs and exams. I'm exempt from most but not all of them because I'm a professional engineer. If you want me to I'll get you a list of what's required to do what and where to go to get it. HCC and San Jacinto Jr. College offer a lot of them.
    The picture in my avatar is of the Houston Ship Channel and was taken from my backyard. I like to sit outside and slap mosquitos while watching countless supertankers, barges and cargo ships of every shape and size carry all sorts of deadly toxins to and fro. It's really beautiful at times.....just don't eat the three eyed fish....

    `. .` .>(((>

    `... `. .` .>(((>

    .` .>(((>

    LMAOSHMSFOAIDMT

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    166
    See above.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    166
    Quote Originally Posted by Cooked View Post
    No, I'm several miles from Greenway Plaza in the heart of the TMC (Texas Medical Center). The city of Houston requires all sorts of certs and exams. I'm exempt from most but not all of them because I'm a professional engineer. If you want me to I'll get you a list of what's required to do what and where to go to get it. HCC and San Jacinto Jr. College offer a lot of them.
    Thanks for the offer. As a senior in high school I am trying to prepare myself for all that this field requires. I'd greatly appreciate any information you can offer. I'm also in Texas, about three hours north of where you are.

    Thanks again. Best

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    38
    Hello: My advice to you is to take every shop class offered in your High School, and get Mechanically Inclined. Then, find a local H.V.A.C. company that will let you work for them as a helper, for free. If they want to pay you, Great, but On the Job Experience is invaluable. Then when you Graduate, find a good trade School, or College that offers a course in the field. I took a 2 year College course in Mechanical, Electrical, Technology, that was geared toward the Stationary Engineer field. Find a School that is recognized by the local Operating Engineers Union, and or Employers in your area. Lastly, be a good hard worker, and get to work early, and leave late, and I'm sure you will make your dream come true. Good Luck to You!

    Wayne,
    Retired Senior Stationary Engineer

    PS: I forgot to say,that if you find a Good College, or Trade School, go buy their Class Book, and Study it.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    166
    Quote Originally Posted by lzenglish View Post
    Hello: My advice to you is to take every shop class offered in your High School, and get Mechanically Inclined. Then, find a local H.V.A.C. company that will let you work for them as a helper, for free. If they want to pay you, Great, but On the Job Experience is invaluable. Then when you Graduate, find a good trade School, or College that offers a course in the field. I took a 2 year College course in Mechanical, Electrical, Technology, that was geared toward the Stationary Engineer field. Find a School that is recognized by the local Operating Engineers Union, and or Employers in your area. Lastly, be a good hard worker, and get to work early, and leave late, and I'm sure you will make your dream come true. Good Luck to You!

    Wayne,
    Retired Senior Stationary Engineer

    PS: I forgot to say,that if you find a Good College, or Trade School, go buy their Class Book, and Study it.

    Thank you. One question I have. Is the Stationary Engineer's exam focused primarily on voilers/steam operations, or does it also include chillers, pumps, etc??

    Thanks again for the input!

    Best

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    38
    Quote Originally Posted by MHall View Post
    Thank you. One question I have. Is the Stationary Engineer's exam focused primarily on voilers/steam operations, or does it also include chillers, pumps, etc??

    Thanks again for the input!

    Best

    Primarily is a Big Word when you talk Stationary Engineer, but if I had to put them in order, I would go with H.V.A.C as number 1. You will also need to know about High and Low pressure boilers, water treatment, ice machines, door hardware, emergency generators, sewage ejector pumps, domestic water systems, etc., etc. About the only thing I did not work on were the Elevators, which are usually contracted out. Do yourself a favor and join the Refrigeration Service Engineers Society "RSES", as they have a wealth of information. I'm an active member for 30 years now. Also, go pick up a few applications at the City, County, State, etc, and read the requirements. I Hope this Helps You!

    Wayne

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