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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    3,789
    haha...good ol' microsoft paint

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by gravity View Post
    Really?

    A check valve is a few bucks and easier to do then a TXV

    Attachment 345321

    normal flow would be from right to left in the cooling mode which uses the txv.

    in heat the flow would be left to right and bypass the txv
    Thank you, that is how I thought it would install but was not sure. I will use this info in the future. How should one size the check valve? Do you match inlet or outlet of the TEV?

  3. #16
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    718
    If you choose to install the check valve, you'll need to add the auxiliary side connector to the refrigerant distributor. The reverse flow during the heating mode has to not only bypass the TEV but also the refrigerant distributor nozzle. The orifice in the nozzle is too small to allow the full mass flow of the system through it without an excessive amount of pressure drop.

    The auxiliary side connector is essentially a tee, that allows you to move the nozzle from the distributor body to the ASC body, which then allows the refrigerant in reverse flow to enter between the nozzle and the distrbutor body, bypassing the nozzle.

    Regarding sizing of the check valve....if it's a 5 ton system, you'll need a check valve capable of 5 tons of mass flow with a minimal pressure drop for the refrigerant in the system.

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  4. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    853
    Quote Originally Posted by bunny View Post
    If you choose to install the check valve, you'll need to add the auxiliary side connector to the refrigerant distributor. The reverse flow during the heating mode has to not only bypass the TEV but also the refrigerant distributor nozzle. The orifice in the nozzle is too small to allow the full mass flow of the system through it without an excessive amount of pressure drop.

    The auxiliary side connector is essentially a tee, that allows you to move the nozzle from the distributor body to the ASC body, which then allows the refrigerant in reverse flow to enter between the nozzle and the distrbutor body, bypassing the nozzle.

    Regarding sizing of the check valve....if it's a 5 ton system, you'll need a check valve capable of 5 tons of mass flow with a minimal pressure drop for the refrigerant in the system.

    Name:  2013-01-12_120532.jpg
Views: 187
Size:  70.4 KB
    Duh... lol , just givin u a hard time bun, your right tho, no one mentioned that, good call

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