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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    41

    Ductless on interior wall

    We have installed a few ductless units, running the lines directly through an exterior wall. Now looking at installing some indoor wall units on interior walls, so it brings up a few concerns. Hopefully someone can give me some guidance. In order to leave the flare connections accessable, I would run the lines to the opposite end of the unit to enter the wall. Right?
    Then either go up into the attic, or down inside the wall to a nearby drain? To go up into the attic, I would install a condensate pump inside the unit? and run to a septic vent line? Do the condensate pumps fit inside the wall unit?
    We all know how common it is for the drain lines to get stopped up...Do I do any special clean out connection? Or would you just lean the bottom of the unit out, and blow out the line?
    To prevent alge from building up in the line, couple times a year, drop a "pan pill" in the pan?
    Do I have all this right? Or have you got a suggestion?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    175
    I wouldnt leave any type of flare connection in the wall because anytime you catch a leak its going to be either at the evap, flare or cond. It doesnt pay to bang the customer for the install and then have to rip open their walls to find a leak in a few years. You could cut an access in the wall where you could connect the flares and then have access to them and finish it with a nice cover. There are various companies that make mini split pumps which pump vertical. These pumps are specially made for this application. there is usally a float which acs as a sensor and then a pump to pump the water out of the pan. I never used the pill as when doing pm we always clean our drain pans of scale and other sediments.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    50
    You would mount to the interior wall and have the line set come out the side and then up into attic. You would then cover it with a line set cover. That way if it needs serviced you just remove the line set cover to get at it. As far as the condensate, order a pump with the unit and run up into attic to a 3/8 copper line insulated line and slope to the outside. You are not allowed to tie into sewer vent per code. The line set covers look very nice and are paintable as well.


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    In a boiler room
    Posts
    7,157
    For the condensate pumps, these are by far the best pumps I have used for mini splits.

    http://airtec.rectorseal.com/condensate/aspen/aqua

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    in a house, Appomattox, Va.
    Posts
    3,318
    I keep complaining that you should not run the lines in the wall- can't get them together right holding the unit and puttung flares together, and worse to try to mess with after the fact.

    last job they listened and were able to run the lines thru wall into closet and up wall. you could access flares and pump from access hole in closet wall. much better.

    one building they ran 9 units into wall- and only 6" sq hole to access pump and fittings inside wall. systems kept leaking for several yrs. and replacing a pump thru 6" hole ain't no fun, either.
    Col 3:23


    questions asked, answers received, ignorance abated

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    41
    Sorry, need to be a little more specific.
    "In order to leave the flare connections accessable, I would run the lines to the opposite end of the unit to enter the wall. Right?"
    I am talking abt new construction. The referigerant lines with flare connections would be running horizontal in the bottom of the indoor unit, then into the wall(not through the wall) , then turn up to attic, or down to under the house. You could access the flare connections by leaning the bottom of the unit out from the wall. Would that work? If so, would there still be room for the condensate pump?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Athens, Ohio
    Posts
    1,888
    I'm with billygoat22 about the extreme hassle of having flare fittings in the wall. I had nothing but trouble with that in spite of taking extreme care during installation.

    Thanks chuckcrj for the tip on the condensate pumps. I found the Mitsubishi pumps were not compact enough for easy installation and did not work as well as expected. Though I think I heard recently that Mitsubishi was coming out with a new condensate pump for the mini-splits.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Burlington , Mass
    Posts
    470
    Your lines in the wall would enter from the left side and you can get at the connections by holding the bottom out off the wall. The back plate shows where to enter and has marks to determine the length of the lines. The direction sheet shows all the info needed to rough in from the left side.
    I'll be there when I get there and not a minute later

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    In a boiler room
    Posts
    7,157
    Quote Originally Posted by GrumpyPawPaw View Post
    Sorry, need to be a little more specific.
    "In order to leave the flare connections accessable, I would run the lines to the opposite end of the unit to enter the wall. Right?"
    I am talking abt new construction. The referigerant lines with flare connections would be running horizontal in the bottom of the indoor unit, then into the wall(not through the wall) , then turn up to attic, or down to under the house. You could access the flare connections by leaning the bottom of the unit out from the wall. Would that work? If so, would there still be room for the condensate pump?
    That would work, but leaves no room for pump. Which you wouldn't even need if you dropped a condensate line down to the basement or crawl space.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    957
    I did one about 15 years ago on an interior wall in a office space. I bored a hole through the wall header opening it into the attic. For the drain I bored a hole through the base of the wall and ran the drain pipe down to the space below to a mop sink. I cut all the flares off and brazed extensions on before mounting, slowly slid the pipes into and up the wall and then hung it. I brought the drain stub out the wall to the left so the flexible drain line coming from the right could connect to my copper stub where it was accessible inside the unit.

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