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Thread: Belt Tightening

  1. #1
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    Belt Tightening

    I just got into the commercial side of the business and I have never seen so many belt driven units. What I am wondering is there a technique for tightening belts or is just by feel. Just don't want to tear any belts up and have lots of call backs just started with company I am at.

  2. #2
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    You can buy the tension tool, http://www.amazon.com/Browning-13025...+tension+gauge
    I my experience using the tool in most cases over-tightens the belts cause new belts are supposed to stretch after so many hours of operation and they try to compensate for it.

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  4. #3
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    Thank you I will look it up.

  5. #4
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    If you over tighten, you should worry less about the belt and more about the bearings. An over tightened belt will kill bearings in a hurry.
    Usually, manufacturers offer a suggested deflection in the middle between the pulleys. I've always done it by feel, to be honest.
    Tighter is not better.
    I havent failed. Ive just found 10,000 ways that wont work. - Thomas Edison

    Its not whether you get knocked down, its whether you get up. - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

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  7. #5
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    Agree with all of the above. The length of the belt matters too in judging the amount of deflection. Getting some squeal on start up is not a bad thing but it should stop soon as motor comes to speed.

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  9. #6
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    A Little Reading
    Attached Images Attached Images

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  11. #7
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    Something else to keep in mind for belt drive equipment-make it a habit of checking set screws for pulleys and adjustable sheeves. They often can come loose and all sorts of drama can result if one comes all the way out.
    Also, check pulleys for wear. They do wear out over time, usually resulting in excessive noise, belt slap or throw belts. The V in the pulley will develop a curved wear spot as it ages.
    I havent failed. Ive just found 10,000 ways that wont work. - Thomas Edison

    Its not whether you get knocked down, its whether you get up. - Vince Lombardi

    "In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics" - Homer Simpson

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  13. #8
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    We change all our belts annually usually around January or February so that on our spring PM we can re tension the belts after they have stretched . Tension is one thing, but don't neglect alignment and worn sheaves. Whenever possible replaced adjustable with fixed sheaves once proper pitch diameter has been determined. fixed sheaves won't wear out, adjustable sheaves really are for set up to set proper CFM, once diameter is determined, go fixed

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  15. #9
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    The Browning manual posted above has lots of great information, read it cover to cover, you won't be disappointed. I still use it as a reference.

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  17. #10
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    I have a great tool for adjusting belts both new and old but it is only for Carlisle belts I have used it often on old equipment and have only had one set of bearing fail to date but on 1999 RTU's I think I am doing ok.
    I have to tell you the first time I used it I thought I was putting way too much tension on but it works great. The best application was on a big 4 belt 75 hp that always seemed to roll a belt, no more rolling and they lasted longer.

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  19. #11
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    I find that most techs over tighten belts. As you gain experience, you won't need a tool or a spec for the majority of situations.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

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  21. #12
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    TB,

    Afraid to admit the same, no tool used anymore, after about a thousand you gain a 7th sense when it comes to belts.

    I also agree full-heartedly with Ikapigian, worn sheaves/pulley/drives are probably the number one most over looked maintenance item I come across. When I see a worn variable pitch, it is usually replaced with a solid. And alignment is another art form to learn whether a straight-edge, string, or laser.

    All comes from experience. Get a set of sheave wear gauges, too.

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  23. #13
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    Follow LOTO a moving fan and belt is Energy. Don't use your foot hand or other body part to stop the fan. Loosen the motor mount and slide the motor in to take the belts off and put new on. Trying to jump the belts over the sheaves will damage the belts and increase the chance of a finger getting pinched or worse. Hard to pick your nose with finger tips laying on the bottom of AHU.
    Proper tension and alinement will save belts and energy. Lots of studies done on that.
    Watch your fingers and toes.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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