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  1. #1

    Aprilaire 600 Sufficient?

    I live in North Carolina and have a 6-month old house that is built to Energy Star standards. I was told it was a TIGHT construction. It has a total of 3200 square feet equally divided between two floors. Its HVAC system is divided into two, installed in the crawl space and attic.

    I am interested in having an Aprilaire Whole-House humidifier installed. I've spoken with 3 contractors and all of them suggest just installing the humidifier in the crawl space. They said that even if I don't install a humidifier in the attic furnace, the humidity will still make it to the 2nd floor. Do you agree with this?

    In addition, one contractor was telling me that the cheaper Aprilaire 600 (evaporative) would be sufficient but another one is telling me that I need the Aprilaire 800 (steam). Is this true?

    I'm trying to avoid a steam humidifier because it has a higher maintainance cost.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
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    68,125
    Is it tight enough that it needs mechanical ventilation. if not, then a single 600 isn't big enough.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    131
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    Is it tight enough that it needs mechanical ventilation. if not, then a single 600 isn't big enough.
    EnergyStar Homes are suppose to have mechanical ventilation based on ASHRAE 62.2. Your home should have approximately 70 CFM of outside air delivered 24 hours a day.

    The type, size and quantity really depends on the humidity level in the house as is and what levels you are trying to achieve.

    What is the humidity level in the home now.
    Did any of the contractors measure the amount of outside air being delivered to the home.
    "The only way in which a human being can make some approach to knowing the whole of a subject is by hearing what can be said about it by persons of every variety of opinion and studying all modes in which it it can be looked at by every character of mind.
    No wise man ever acquired his wisdom in any mode but this."
    John Stuart Mill

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,196
    If it were really tight I would not think you would need a humidifier.

    Sent from my HTC VLE_U using Tapatalk 2

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    Is it tight enough that it needs mechanical ventilation. if not, then a single 600 isn't big enough.
    Yes, my system is tight enough that it does have mechanical ventilation.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by tlj000 View Post
    What is the humidity level in the home now?
    Did any of the contractors measure the amount of outside air being delivered to the home.
    I had been measuring the humidity and it ranges from 30 to 40.

    I know, this almost seems to be near the ideal range of 35-50. But at the low 30s I'm still getting nosebleeds and my mother-in-law is still having a hard time breathing at night.

    But because it doesn't get very cold here in the Carolinas, the humidifier may not have to work too much.

    So what's your verdict?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,196
    I remember selling a humidifier once to a fairly tight home. Afterwards they complained that it didn't stop their nosebleeds and other ailments. I checked the humidity, it was plenty high. You can get one and it won't run much, that's true. But you aren't that dry!

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