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  1. #1
    I recently had a Trane XV-90, two-stage furnace installed.

    I can't say that I have ever been aware of the unit kicking into stage two. How will I know stage 2 is being utilized? (According to the installation manual the temperature rise for stage 1 (65% gas) versus stage 2 (100% gas) is only a couple of degrees at medium low fan speed (and that doesn't make sense to me.)

    From reading the manual, it seemed to suggest that stage two is triggered when the room temperature falls at least one degree while operating in stage one, and then it waits 10 minutes before turning on stage 2.

    Is this typical?

    To me, the logic seems off. I would think if the temperature in the room remained either at the same number below the requested temperature for a certain period of time [e.g., you have it set on 68 but it can't get the room above 62 for x time), or a certain period of time has elapsed and the requested temperature is still not reached, then stage two would kick in.

    Your thoughts?

    Thanks,
    Edgar


  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,109
    2 stage stat or timer?

    With a good 2 stage stat, unless it is bitter cold, it may not switch to high unless you do a setback. The idea is long run times on gentle low fire. With a 2 stage stat, the stat decides on high or low. If it calls for high, you should get it within 30 seconds. The 10 minutes is for a single stage with timer or if a stat calls for both stages at once. A good 2 stage stat will have some logic in it and try to stay on low if possible.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Posts
    98
    It would depend if you have a two stage stat of if the board is timed. Remove your stat and look to see if W1 and W2 have wires to them. If there is no W2, it's not a two stage stat. If there is and has a seperate wire attatched, hopefully it is programed to be two stage. I personally have mine timed. It rarely goes into to high fire except in setback mode.
    Two stages of heat is ideal to help maintain a constant temp in the rooms of your home without blasting out the heat all at once. Especially benificial if your stat is in room that has good airflow but other rooms suffer because they dont.
    Even the worlds smartest people have the most worn out erasers!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Posts
    98
    It would depend if you have a two stage stat of if the board is timed. Remove your stat and look to see if W1 and W2 have wires to them. If there is no W2, it's not a two stage stat. If there is and has a seperate wire attatched, hopefully it is programed to be two stage. I personally have mine timed. It rarely goes into to high fire except in setback mode.
    Two stages of heat is ideal to help maintain a constant temp in the rooms of your home without blasting out the heat all at once. Especially benificial if your stat is in room that has good airflow but other rooms suffer because they dont.
    When the unit fires in two stage, it will also jump to medium high fan speed. That diff in air movement and maybe 15 - 20 degrees (guess) should be noticed.
    Try this: Set your stat to 80. Grab a beer and sit at the furnace. You'll hear it!
    Even the worlds smartest people have the most worn out erasers!

  5. #5
    The Trane thermostat is two-stage, to answer the question posed.


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