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  1. #1

    Oil Burner Transformer

    I know the screwdriver arcing method, but i'd rather not go that route unless its the only way. Can I just try for continuity across the high voltage springs with power off, there showing OL to me now but was not sure if thats a proper method.

    I'm kind of without heat until the morning haha, sucks because I'm in New Hampshire!

  2. #2
    Arc'd out the transformer & seemed fine, strong arc. So I pulled out the burner housing and hooked it up to the soft copper feed line outside of furnace and in a bucket. Not a drop of oil out of nozzle, weird thing is I started at the nozzle and worked my way all the way to the pump and I could blow air through every piece just using my mouth

    When I got down to the pump it wouldn't even piss out the 90 elbow that the soft copper feeds out of. So I took the entire front of the pump off, all the way to the motor shaft that's key wayed. Then I broke that down as it splits and there's a gasket. Other than the gasket being pretty beat up I didn't see much out of the norm. Since its 11pm I was carful with the gasket and made it work until I can grab a new one.

    Bolted everything back and she fired right up......I'm baffled. I really don't think I had air in line because I held that bleeder open and it stayed ... Hate not knowing but figured I'd ask for any second opinions.


    The original problem was the pump would come on during a call for heat but would time out with no ignition...then eventually locked out the furnace.

    I'm in school for HVAC/R and have completed refrigeration and gas heat....so getting knee deep in my oil furnace was a ' learn as you go' for me tonight....just wish I knew what was up.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    SouthEast NC ICW & Piedmont Foothills
    Posts
    7,635
    1-the proper test is with a high voltage stick meter

    2-hard to follow that second post, money says she'll stop again, sooner or later.

    3-blowing thru oil line with mouth just gets oily taste in mouth, but-hey if it trips your trigger.....
    It`s better to be silent and thought the fool; than speak and remove all doubt.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by dandyme View Post
    1-the proper test is with a high voltage stick meter

    2-hard to follow that second post, money says she'll stop again, sooner or later.

    3-blowing thru oil line with mouth just gets oily taste in mouth, but-hey if it trips your trigger.....
    Yea I typed it up at 2AM last night, sorry if it's a little hard to follow. But everything seems to be in working order, the pumps pulling fine, its getting to the burner now, and theres a nice strong arc across the transformer secondary.

    Not sure but you don't sound like a fan of the screwdriver test, but I was at midnight with no heat. Anyway hopefully your wrong, and doesn't push anymore issues my way.

    Appreciate the constructive feedback.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    SouthEast NC ICW & Piedmont Foothills
    Posts
    7,635
    i firmly believe in the screwdriver test, but you have to understand it.
    you can get a good arc and hook a real tester up to the x-former and it show "bad"
    It`s better to be silent and thought the fool; than speak and remove all doubt.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,897
    Quote Originally Posted by greenhorn0311 View Post
    Arc'd out the transformer & seemed fine, strong arc.
    So I pulled out the burner housing and hooked it up to the soft copper feed line outside of furnace and in a bucket. Not a drop of oil out of nozzle, weird thing is I started at the nozzle and worked my way all the way to the pump and I could blow air through every piece just using my mouth

    When I got down to the pump it wouldn't even piss out the 90 elbow that the soft copper feeds out of. So I took the entire front of the pump off, all the way to the motor shaft that's key wayed. Then I broke that down as it splits and there's a gasket. Other than the gasket being pretty beat up I didn't see much out of the norm. Since its 11pm I was careful with the gasket and made it work until I can grab a new one.

    Bolted everything back and she fired right up......I'm baffled. I really don't think I had air in line because I held that bleeder open and it stayed ... Hate not knowing but figured I'd ask for any second opinions.

    The original problem was the pump would come on during a call for heat but would time out with no ignition...then eventually locked out the furnace.

    I'm in school for HVAC/R and have completed refrigeration and gas heat....so getting knee deep in my oil furnace was a ' learn as you go' for me tonight....just wish I knew what was up.
    What make & model is the burner?

    Is the fuel/oil pump a Suntec pump?

    There are three filter/strainers from the tank to where the oil feeds the nozzle.

    Of course, there is one you see on the line coming from the tank, then there is a strainer inside the pump housing ahead of the fuel/oil pump inlet; the third is the porous bronze filter on the inlet of the nozzle.

    The strainer ahead of the pump-inlet is usually never listed by the oil furnace companies & therefore is normally never checked, or cleaned, or replaced when needed. It can become the hidden problem...

    I know a place where you can order those strainers with gaskets; they are very low cost, but an important component for proper oil delivery to the pump & nozzle.

    Did your pump not have a strainer inside the pump cover plate when removed?

    Oil needs to be delivered to the nozzle at +80-psig & then quickly get to 100-psig for the nozzle to fully atomize the fuel-oil for efficient burning. A 100-psig is the minimum yours could call for up to 140-psig.

    Also, for burners under 2-GPH the secondary combustion air band should be closed & only the primary air inlet setting used. Your burner's nozzle is probably an .85-GPH or a .90-GPH nozzle.(?)

    You need a way to get a fairly accurate reading of the airflow CFM through the HT-EX &, then get a supply air temp-rise number X's 1.1 = Btuh output of the burner in relation to its Rating. 90-temp-rise over RA * 1.1= 99 * lets say, 960-CFM= 95,040-Btuh

    Fuel oil at 140,000-BTUH per gal * .85 nozzle is 119,000-Btuh Input * .80% efficiency is 95,200-Btuh output; may only be at 75% efficiency.(?)

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