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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    146
    can someone point me to written documents recommending replacement of furnaces and boilers damaged by flood waters?

    thnx n advance,
    jojo

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    12,181
    Perhaps you should have read the instructions before calling.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    149
    Originally posted by jrbenny
    GAMA:

    http://www.gamanet.org/gama/news.nsf...20Katriana.pdf
    I do not consider that source to be exactly unbiased.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    12,181
    So, perhaps you would like a third party that has nothing to do with furnace repairs to say 'Yeah, just change some things, and it will be just fine.'

    Sure.
    Perhaps you should have read the instructions before calling.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,597
    Originally posted by zzyzzx


    I do not consider that source to be exactly unbiased. [/B]
    if you're going to repair flood damaged equipment, you may want to increase the limits on your insurance policy. no contractor in his right mind would repair flood damaged equipment.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    149
    Originally posted by jrbenny
    So, perhaps you would like a third party that has nothing to do with furnace repairs to say 'Yeah, just change some things, and it will be just fine.'

    Sure.
    The source was an appliance manufacturers group. Of course they want you to buy a new one. I'd like to see what someone who actually repairs appliances would say.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    317
    "The source was an appliance manufacturers group. Of course they want you to buy a new one. I'd like to see what someone who actually repairs appliances would say."

    I think BVILLA "actually repairs appliances" so dont that count?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    12,181
    Originally posted by zzyzzx
    Originally posted by jrbenny
    So, perhaps you would like a third party that has nothing to do with furnace repairs to say 'Yeah, just change some things, and it will be just fine.'

    Sure.
    The source was an appliance manufacturers group. Of course they want you to buy a new one. I'd like to see what someone who actually repairs appliances would say.
    Guess who the people that repair appliances call for advice on repair or replace.
    Perhaps you should have read the instructions before calling.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    2,651
    Originally posted by zzyzzx
    Originally posted by jrbenny
    So, perhaps you would like a third party that has nothing to do with furnace repairs to say 'Yeah, just change some things, and it will be just fine.'

    Sure.
    The source was an appliance manufacturers group. Of course they want you to buy a new one. I'd like to see what someone who actually repairs appliances would say.
    good enough.......JUNK IT......it is unsafe,..... period.......not on my watch,will i ever say.....oh it should be fine.........think about dude,are you for real?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    what type of fuel?

    what type of furnace?

    what type of building?
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Posts
    516
    Originally posted by jrbenny
    GAMA:

    http://www.gamanet.org/gama/news.nsf...20Katriana.pdf
    Looks like good advice to me.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    103
    Yah, imagine those greedy money grubbing manufacturers wanting you to replace equipment that has been flooded. 1. The electronics on the circuit board have probably been damaged. 2. I only work on gas equipment so this may not apply, the gas control valve has some springs and solinoids, imagine how well those will work after being water soaked. 3. Some of the limit and rollout switches are thermal snap switches, suppose they corroded or got some sand in them and don't trip. 4. The inducer and blower probably have dirt and grit in them, and the bearings may have been damaged.
    Every furnace and gas vavle manufacturer has a warning that if the equipment has been flooded, it should be replaced, there is a good reason.
    Yet, if there were a problem, you would probably have no problem hiring a lawyer to sue for a defective product.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    I have a luxaire condenser that was under salt water, still runs for over 2 years. Never complain about a bristol again.
    The way we build has a greater impact on our comfort, energy consumption and IAQ than any HVAC system we install.

    http://www.ductstrap.com/

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