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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Mid-Mo
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    3,595
    Quote Originally Posted by jayguy View Post
    agreed. go lower. below 500 microns is better but lower is best. lower and holding is an even better proof to a non leaking system. keep in mind that some things leak under a vacuum and some things leak under pressure so continue to leak check. since this is a unit that has had a lot of issues, you need to keep going until you checked everything several times and then several times again.
    This is solid advice considering you have no idea how long the system was open for. Sometimes bigger machines take forever to get to 500 microns (days not hours). With that being said, if this isn't a critical unit, take your time and do everything correctly the way it needs to be done.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,134
    Quote Originally Posted by ryan1088 View Post
    This is solid advice considering you have no idea how long the system was open for. Sometimes bigger machines take forever to get to 500 microns (days not hours). With that being said, if this isn't a critical unit, take your time and do everything correctly the way it needs to be done.
    I disagree with the premise a flooded chiller has to be evacuated to 500 microns. The OP said he got to 700 microns and after sitting overnight it was 730 microns. That is excellent in my book. Field evacuations of 5 mm was the acceptable standard for York flooded chillers. (That's 5000 microns, so 700 with a rise of 30 in twelve hours is more than acceptable by those standards.)

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    7
    ONE OF YOU GUYS ASK FOR M/N WHR060B1 MCQUAY

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    2,020
    Quote Originally Posted by KnewYork View Post
    I disagree with the premise a flooded chiller has to be evacuated to 500 microns. The OP said he got to 700 microns and after sitting overnight it was 730 microns. That is excellent in my book. Field evacuations of 5 mm was the acceptable standard for York flooded chillers. (That's 5000 microns, so 700 with a rise of 30 in twelve hours is more than acceptable by those standards.)
    Agreed. When I was reading this thread I was thinking "well, what about the guys saying it has a leaking evaporator?" Well, even if I had repaired the evap, these numbers are still good. If you're (the OP) concerned about whether or not it is leaking, go ahead and drop the heads and test it. But a 30 micron rise overnight? I probably won't even see that on a mercury manometer, and I trust that over an electronic micron gauge.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    7

    Hmm

    about the leak in the evap. or cond. barrel I thought that I would have or get water in the compressor oil or multiple compressor failure. no different then an air to air system. if this has been going on for a year or two.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Not in Iran
    Posts
    1,085
    i know r22 for 30 lbs is $400.00

    WHAT!!!!!
    no signature blast'em man blast'em
    !!!KILL THE TERRORIST!!!

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    peoples republic of maryland
    Posts
    956
    Quote Originally Posted by KnewYork View Post
    I disagree with the premise a flooded chiller has to be evacuated to 500 microns. The OP said he got to 700 microns and after sitting overnight it was 730 microns. That is excellent in my book. Field evacuations of 5 mm was the acceptable standard for York flooded chillers. (That's 5000 microns, so 700 with a rise of 30 in twelve hours is more than acceptable by those standards.)
    In McQuay school/ staunton Va. many moons ago..... they at the factory only pull brand new chillers to 1000 microns before charging. 700 rising to 730 overnight is dang good. I'd like to see it lower just for the due diligence of making sure no miosture contaminants are in the machine but only rising 30 microns don't sound bad. I would have pressure tested with nitrogen before pulling a vaccum if "others" were telling you of an evaporator leak so you you don't inadvertantly pull water in but it sounds like you survived.
    "The meek shall inherit the earth"
    "he that's walking with wise persons will become wise, but he that is having dealings with the stupid ones will fare badly" Proverbs 13:20
    "Pressure is something people feel when they don't know what their doing". Peyton Manning-superbowl MVP

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    7

    Frown

    Hi guys, sorry about not getting back faster to you.I have had a lot going on. Yes I think I survived so far no problems with chiller. I was always told 500 microns is the magic number for a good vacuum in a refrigeration system. About the leak we will know in about 6 months. They say that is how long it will take to leak down. Good or bad I like the feed back. KEEP ME ON THE RIGHT TRACK PLEASE GUYS!! I'm a Diamond in the rough.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    7
    HI GUYS I'M BACK, THE MCQUAY CHILLER IS DOING FINE. NO COMPLAINTS. BUT NOW I'M LOOKING INTO A TRANE CHILLER M# RTWA125. I CHECK THIS CHILLER EVERY MORNING. I HAVE NOTICE THAT IT HAS A NON LATCHING ALARM (LOW CHILL WATER TEMPATURE). DO YOU GUYS THINK THAT IT LOST IT SETTINGS. THIS SYSTEM DOES HAVE A CONDENSER WATER BYPASS. THEY SENT SOMEBODY OVER THERE TO TAKE A LOOK AT IT. I DO NOT KNOW WHO. BUT IT IS STILL DOING THE SAME THING. I RATHER ASK YOU GUYS THEN TO GET TREATED LIKE A MUSHROOM. IF YOU NEED MORE INFO JUST LET ME KNOW. THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Mississippi
    Posts
    1,337
    Set point? Approach? H2o temps? Need more info

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    2,020
    Yep, a full set of logs, including entering and leaving water pressures (taken with a single gauge) would help. Also, what is normal operation of this chiller? Does it run 24/7? Is it turned off every night? My initial concern would be chilled water flow, and the integrity of the chilled water flow switch. Also, first 4 digits/letters of serial number would help, so we can determine what control panel it has. Or you could just tell us which one is on it. I have seen historical diagnostics reported by owners as current, active diagnostics. Not saying that is the case here, just pointing out the difficulties of "remote" troubleshooting with a lack of info.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    7
    GOTCHA GUYS WORKING ON THE DATA LOG. IT MIGHT TAKE ME WHILE JUST BEAR WITH ME PLEASE. FLOW SWITCH HAS BEEN CHANGED, THIS CHILLER DOES TURN OFF BY OUTSIDE AIR & BMS.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,134
    Quote Originally Posted by hvac1973 View Post
    GOTCHA GUYS WORKING ON THE DATA LOG. IT MIGHT TAKE ME WHILE JUST BEAR WITH ME PLEASE. FLOW SWITCH HAS BEEN CHANGED, THIS CHILLER DOES TURN OFF BY OUTSIDE AIR & BMS.
    Did your caps lock key get stuck? Please unstick it. It appears you are yelling at us. I, for one, would rather see no caps rather than all caps.

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