Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 24
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8

    Garage heating help needed!

    Here is my dilemma. I have a 5kw electric heater that I was given. I mounted it and put a double pole line voltage thermostat (Cadet T410B) in line. the problem I am having is the Fan of the unit (which is 110v) runs all the time when the thermostat is in the on position regardless of temperature selected. The heating element is operating fine and only kicks on when it reaches the set temp. I have tried putting the fan power feed wire to the control side and it still runs all the time. I am assuming that it is getting power feed back. If this was a 12v system I would just put an appropriate diode in the system but with AC current I cannot do that. Does anyone have any ideas?


    The L2/T2 leads are on anytime the thermostat is in the on position and only breaks when turned to the off position, the L1/T1 leads are thermostatically controlled. if this unit had a 220v motor I would not have any issues but since it has a 110v motor and one side always has power the fan spins. I need either a t-stat that controls both sides (which I cannot seem to find) or some kind of switching device. I am at a loss

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,753
    I don't think your 220 volt fan would run to long on 120 volts so you might not have to worry about it if that is really the issue of which I doubt because in order to actually run the fan would have to have a complete circuit. If I am wrong feel free to critique, we are not allowed to give specifics on DIY or "garage" mechanics.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,037
    The limitations that you are running into might be part of the reason you were given the unit. Have any friends that are qualified electricians or HVAC control techs? What your looking for is going to end up being DIY info that site rules don't allow.
    Use the biggest hammer you like, pounding a square peg into a round hole does not equal a proper fit.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by toocoolforschool View Post
    I don't think your 220 volt fan would run to long on 120 volts so you might not have to worry about it if that is really the issue of which I doubt because in order to actually run the fan would have to have a complete circuit. If I am wrong feel free to critique, we are not allowed to give specifics on DIY or "garage" mechanics.
    The unit has a 120v fan not a 220v fan, I wish it had a 220v fan then I would not have this issue.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by firecontrol View Post
    The limitations that you are running into might be part of the reason you were given the unit. Have any friends that are qualified electricians or HVAC control techs? What your looking for is going to end up being DIY info that site rules don't allow.
    I wish I had friends that were in the HVAC field, then I could find a thermostat that controls both sides of the unit. I do not know any electricians either.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Why do the site rules not allow advice? isn't that the purpose of a forum? all I need is someone to tell me where to get a true dual control thermostat

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,930
    Quote Originally Posted by muk View Post
    Why do the site rules not allow advice? isn't that the purpose of a forum? all I need is someone to tell me where to get a true dual control thermostat

    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread....NO-DIY-Why-NOT

    What you need isn't someone to tell you how to get a thermostat, what you need is someone to tell you how to fix the mistake that you made.

    Not a tough thing if it is the same mistake I made when I wired up my first electric radiant system, but it's a bugger if you don't know what is happening.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,428
    Quote Originally Posted by muk View Post
    all I need is someone to tell me where to get a true dual control thermostat
    ACE

    A Competent Electrician

    If you don't get an ACE, and draw a 6 of clubs, you'll get knocked right on your A$$.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by jpsmith1cm View Post
    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread....NO-DIY-Why-NOT

    What you need isn't someone to tell you how to get a thermostat, what you need is someone to tell you how to fix the mistake that you made.

    Not a tough thing if it is the same mistake I made when I wired up my first electric radiant system, but it's a bugger if you don't know what is happening.
    Actually what I need is someone to point me in the direction of a thermostat or control board that will control both sides of the heater, I do not understand why you think I made a mistake? because I have not. I know exactly what is happening and why, if you read my first post you would have hopefully understood it.

    The problem is that the 220v heater has a 110v fan in it so the fan always spins (because only one side is controlled thermostatically and the other has voltage anytime the T-stat is on) . I need a way to block/control the voltage to both sides of the the heater. I cannot install a rectifier or Diode because that would change the AC current to DC.

    All I want is product recommendations. such hey did you look into this or that.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    Honestly I'm not a big fan of electric resistance heaters unless you're an industrial plant with low electric rates or make your own power. Too large a load and too expensive to operate. Do you have natural gas?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Yes I do, and I have a heater but the gas line is not ran to the garage and the house is currently a rental and we are in the process of trying to buy it but the land lord is undecided about selling it. If it were my house I would run the gas line because I already have the 1" yellow line and risers but the landlord wont let me run it. I want to keep the garage warm because I keep my dogs out there also do a lot of work out there. I was a 20 year Master Auto tech before switching to IT 2 years ago and do a lot of side work. What really kills me is I got the gas line from my father, he was a self employed HVAC contractor but passed away and now I have no one to rely on to guide me.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,753
    Quote Originally Posted by muk View Post
    The unit has a 120v fan not a 220v fan, I wish it had a 220v fan then I would not have this issue.
    Yes, my bad I thought it was 220v. Anyways I don't think modernizing your landlords house is in your best interest especially if you are not a hvac contractor unless of course you are clairvoyant. All you have to do is call a tech out and spend some money to get it done right. Good luck.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,037
    Let me see if I can explain why you're getting the responses you're getting and not what you're looking for.

    First of all all electric heaters are not designed and controlled the same. So, with out us knowing exactly what brand and model you have so that we can look up the electrical/control schematic for it we can't (wouldn't) even guess as to the correct type of control to do what you want done. Simple stating, what you have told us gives no one with the knowledge and any amount of experience any way of knowing how to help in a way that won't potentially put you in harms way and/or violate the site rules. If it makes any difference, if I was fielding a phone call from a tech in the field and they gave me the information you supplied I'd be telling them the same thing. I'd be using different words.... but that's just me.

    So, with that said, if you were to supply a model and serial number for the unit the rules "might" allow for further help in the way of possibly suggesting a control.

    As a side note: Please do not attempt to install the underground gas line components you have. All of the manufacturer's require specific training in the installation of these products due to the very real potential for deadly consequences if not done correctly. The installation also requires specialized tools.
    Gas that escapes from a line buried underground is many times more dangerous that from a leak above ground. #1 is the dirt will filter out the odorant/smell that is purposely added to gas so you can smell a leak and be warned of the danger. #2 a leak underground can move horizontally for a long distance and then show up ...... in your home through a crack in the foundation, in the garage through a crack in the floor, in your neighbors yard or house and without the odorant with the first indication a lot of times being a loud explosion followed most times by news film on TV.
    Use the biggest hammer you like, pounding a square peg into a round hole does not equal a proper fit.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event