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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    NORTHERN
    Posts
    989
    common to r22 smaller "chiller" units an OEM stated with condensing gauges reading near 110 deg to 120 o the gauge, suction should not exceed 50 deg , ever in can- recips..
    but HeatCraft (customer purchase and then I took bid to apply ) techs said never over 47 deg in immediate start condition suction temps -gauge ...

    both OEM's discussed a "foaming of the oil"

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Dearborn MI
    Posts
    103
    I would just like to suggest another way to look at the Trane oil pressure problem.. 40 psi is more than adequate to lubricate the running gear of the compressor and to operate the unloaders. When rods go "crunch" and bearings look like "swiss cheese" are they blackened and burned or shiny and scored with balled up metal fragments? The first condition generally means that the part failed from lack of oil supply. There was not enough oil getting to the part which caused tremendous friction and heat which "cooked" the little oil that was left on the part and left a black, almost gritty residue. The second condition generally means that the part failed from lack of lubrication, not lack of oil. Simply stated, the oil that was being delivered to the failed parts could not do its job. The reason for this is LIQUID REFRIGERANT in the oil. Oil dilution will kill a compressor just as surely as no oil pressure would. The refrigerant rich oil actually cools the part AS IT FAILS, resulting in a part that is broken but is generally shiny with no signs of cooked oil. Often a good tech needs to stop blaming the compressor company and start looking deeper into system flaws that actually cause the compressor failure.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    NORTHERN
    Posts
    989
    Quote Originally Posted by remanworld View Post
    ..another way to look at ...a good tech

    [[DOES AGREE]]
    to stop blaming the compressor company and

    [[DOES LOOK]]

    ... deeper into system flaws that actually cause the compressor failure.
    since good is a given, it must be received like any gift and shared as I would hope techs so do.

    T's 4 all Re !

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    423
    So am I right in saying that the actual net oil pressure shouldn't. Change with unloading? Also I can see the bearings over hearin from lack of lubrication but for the top end to crunch how does the oil get in the cylinders?

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