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  1. #1

    Re-insulating an open crawlspace with ductwork

    The rigid insulation in our crawl spaces was removed after hurricane Sandy (flooding 12-13" over the first floor) and it was suggested that we use closed cell foam as a replacement defense against the next flood. The foam would encapsulate all the ducts and pipes under the house (new but slight rust showing from the recent flood) and the UF wiring. We are installing larger valves to open when the flood returns and again goes over the registers in the house floor. The replacement flooring will be oak on 3/4" "Advantech" sub-flooring. (We cannot raise the house at this time.)

    Is that a good idea? We worry about future access to ducts, pipes and wiring.

    Thanks to any advice giver!

    Stuart

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Mount Airy, MD
    Posts
    7,281
    Thread relocated to AOP

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Metro Atlanta
    Posts
    783
    This question may be better suited for an encapsulation expert, not heating and air guys.

    I did a crawl space encapsulation project with one time, it was not a fun job, but I made sure it was done right.

    I applied a plastic liner all over the entire floor area, and went up half way up the concrete block wall, then hired a company spray Icynene to the concrete block, we did not spray the joist.

    Lots of time you leave the floor joist open because the only thing you need to spray is the outside walls, but even if you spray them, you can easily remove the foam from the area you need to work on.
    The opinions expressed by me are not that of my employer.


    insulation modern marvels
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g37riSkyZzM

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,533
    Quote Originally Posted by NY2GA01 View Post
    This question may be better suited for an encapsulation expert, not heating and air guys.

    I did a crawl space encapsulation project with one time, it was not a fun job, but I made sure it was done right.

    I applied a plastic liner all over the entire floor area, and went up half way up the concrete block wall, then hired a company spray Icynene to the concrete block, we did not spray the joist.

    Lots of time you leave the floor joist open because the only thing you need to spray is the outside walls, but even if you spray them, you can easily remove the foam from the area you need to work on.
    Plastic on the earth, sealing vents to the outside, and rigid foam on the walls is best long term. Accessability to the mechanics are best this way. Dehumidification to maintain <60%RH is suggested to eliminate any mold growth during times of high outdoor dew points.
    Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,739
    Salt water or fresh?
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

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