Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 14 to 23 of 23
  1. #14
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,084
    Your "tech" needs to put a digital manometer on the vent system and see what vacuum the pressure switch is seeing. That very simple move will tell him if there is a problem with the vent/intake/drain or not. Without doing this, he will not be able to diagnose the issue. Of course my guess is he doesn't have a digital manometer and know how to use it or he would have done this already.

    What happens if you disconnect the intake pipe at the furnace and run with just the exhaust? You appear to be right on the line of needing 3" so it is possible that they cut it too close. Are the elbows used very long sweep or fairly sharp bends?

    One other thought, be sure furnace is very level or leaning foward. If leaning backwards any, that could explain it.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    6,799
    Put a level on the furnace to see if its leaning away from the drain direction. Are they certain the furnace drain is trapped exactly per manufactures install manual. It should drain when the furnace is on if it isn't then its not trapped properly or the neg pressure created by the draft inducer is overcoming the size of ptrap installed. Also, increasing the vent pipe from 2" to 3" would be a good idea since it is awfully close to the max length for 2". That would probably solve the issue.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Northeast Ohio
    Posts
    4,842
    Should not be water in the combustion fan. I believe that model has a vent connector just above the combustion blower that acts as a condesate collector for the exhaust vent. This should be connected to the secondary drain tubing inside the furnace cabinet. There is something very simple somewhere in the drain system (I think) that someone missed. The symptoms described are indicative of improper draining of condensate.
    A good HVAC tech knows how, an educated HVAC tech knows why!

    DEM


  4. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    6
    I'll be uploading pics shortly - and Joe, I shot you an email.

    Moto, excuse my ignorance, but I'm not quite sure what you mean when you say to run it using indoor combustion air... Is there a switch I can flip or something? It's in a basement, and the exhaust is vented outdoors (out the side of the house, not the roof) - there's a little cap on the exhaust pipe outside that separates the exhaust from the intake (which is pulling from outside as well). There's no fireplace or chimney in the house, and being that it was built in 1985, I don't think it's very drafty upstairs. The pipe used to stick out about 1' from the house and was vented in opposite directions using 45s, but the plumber has since capped it but that didn't solve the problem.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    6
    Name:  100MEDIA_IMAG0417.jpg
Views: 412
Size:  29.6 KBName:  100MEDIA_IMAG0418.jpg
Views: 397
Size:  34.5 KBName:  100MEDIA_IMAG0422.jpg
Views: 418
Size:  41.5 KBName:  100MEDIA_IMAG0423.jpg
Views: 425
Size:  19.5 KBName:  100MEDIA_IMAG0424.jpg
Views: 402
Size:  41.9 KBName:  100MEDIA_IMAG0425.jpg
Views: 406
Size:  23.7 KB

    Ok, here's several photos of the unit - note the unfinished pipe that's above the one that drains into the condensate pump is for the A/C (which is not yet hooked up since it's winter - we'll hook the condenser up in the spring)

    A few things to note after another call to Allied Air tech support (who still couldn't figure it out)

    - There is water in the inducer fan, which we already knew. There's a small puddle below the inducer fan where said water is dripping out and pooling - the collection box is behind the inducer fan, and there's a hole where (as I understand) the fan pulls air from. That collection box is supposed to drain into the condensate pump, which does appear to be working fine. I think the water is coming from that hole above the collection box - there could be 2 reasons for this... 1) there's a problem with the seal between the fan and the hole (I believe there's an o-ring somewhere?) which means there is water dripping out of that connection and pooling below the inducer fan (which could lead to a problem with the vacuum that's supposed to be created by the inducer fan, causing an airlock in the collection box which impedes proper drainage, allowing the water level to rise to the point of spilling thru that hole and into the inducer motor) or 2) the inducer fan housing is not watertight (and is therefore not airtight, causing the same aforementioned vacuum problem). Those are my new theories anyway LOL
    - My house sometimes smells like exhaust, so I'm thinking maybe it's an issue with one of the 2 above mentioned things, because my house shouldn't smell like exhaust - it's vented out the side of my house rather than on the roof, and this **** is noxious. I can smell it strongly when I walk outside while the furnace is running to the point that I can smell it inside my car etc, so maybe some of it is just seeping back into the house under the door etc since it's not venting out the roof, but sometimes my house reeks of it (and sometimes it totally doesn't - so maybe it's a leak somewhere, or maybe it's just dependent upon the direction the wind is blowing). I do have CO detectors which do work, but do not go off, so that's the good news about that.

    Any ideas now that you're able to see pics?

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    21,057
    Two things:

    First: Water should not get as far as the spot you speak of... so it is not the furnace. Did your plumber follow the directions for the drain?

    Second: Obviously the vent pipe is not done correctly, or you would not have combustion gas smells inside. Again, did your plumber follow the directions for the vent pipes?

    DO NOT run that furnace with that smell getting inside the house!
    You are risking CO (carbon monoxide) poisoning... and your baby is WAAAY more sensitive than you are. Some of us here (myself included) have a special certification (expensive), and we know how DANGEROUS it is. Again, do NOT run that furnace. Spend the nite with someone else if you have to.

    This is leaning more and more towards bad install. There is a reason one pays the $$$ for a professional to do the work... because we know what we are doing.

    Did the plumber who installed it follow the directions in the installation manual supplied with the furnace?
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    6,799
    Do not let the plumber do forced air hvac and do not let the hvac tech lay a septic field. You need a professional hvac contractor at your house immediately, not joe blow from down the road that dabbles in hvac but a reputable company with training in natural gas. Like ga said, your baby is way more sensitive to CO poisoning than an adult (ever hear of SIDS? Aka CO poisoning IMO) the vent off furnace should not terminate within at least 3' of any building opening (window, door, soffit vent, foundation vent etc.) if their is an internal leak on the furnace that would explain your pressure switch problem. Please do not operate the furnace until all problems are resolved. Get one of these http://www.jpgorman.com/carbon-monoxide-detector.html

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    21,057
    Agree with post #20! The alarm in the link is sensitive enough to actually protect you.

    The alarms you get at the big box stores are not sensitive enough... by the time they blow, you have already been exposed to WAAAY too much CO. Remember that precious baby, IMO not worth the chance...
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  9. #22
    Look for 3 things, on the outside of that furnace where the condensate comes out it needs an open 3/4 inch t to drain properly and in the furnace box there is a screen for the intake on a 2 pipe system don't use that in a very cold climate it will literally freeze shut and not get enough combustion air, also it may not be the furnace I have seen many furnaces blamed for a thermostat problem. send a pic of the outside of the furnace where the drain is, also the vent outside of the house pay special attention to the inside of the vent pipes.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
    Posts
    21,057
    Quote Originally Posted by DADSTER35 View Post
    Look for 3 things, on the outside of that furnace where the condensate comes out it needs an open 3/4 inch t to drain properly and in the furnace box there is a screen for the intake on a 2 pipe system don't use that in a very cold climate it will literally freeze shut and not get enough combustion air, also it may not be the furnace I have seen many furnaces blamed for a thermostat problem. send a pic of the outside of the furnace where the drain is, also the vent outside of the house pay special attention to the inside of the vent pipes.
    Issue is resolved.
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event