What is a clumsy guy to do in HVAC?
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    141

    What is a clumsy guy to do in HVAC?

    Hi all

    I'm in a dilemma. I'm working in HVAC warranty-related call center doing non-commission sales right now. The pay is not bad but I find it very unfulfilling. What with calling contractors all day to ask if they would like some info (leaving messages 90% of the time).

    I find the HVAC field to be very interesting, but alas, I am not good at all with my hands. I can't manipulate an object with any kind of precision which pretty much disqualifies me for standard field work. I would love to stay in the HVAC business and would like if some kind soul could make some suggestions on other ways of getting involved.

    Here is what I am good at:
    - Excellent with computers and pretty much everything you can do on them. I can even fix a lot problems they have.
    - Great people skills, dedicated to getting along with others and treating customers well. Have some experience in de-escalating issues and difficult customers.
    - Very knowledgeable when it comes to extended warranties; that means I not only understand how they work, but how they can be very profitable to contractors and how to avoid claim denials.
    - Always eager to improve processes, facilitate day-to-day operations and keep the machine well-lubricated, metaphorically-speaking.
    - Good marketing skills and writing; limited knowledge of graphic design.
    - Not afraid of speaking in public.
    - Hard working and very detail-oriented; better do it well now and not have to fix it later.
    - Not afraid of getting my hands dirty; as long as it doesn't involve manual precision!
    - Basic knowledge of reporting and data, and how to use it.
    - Appetite for learning new things, and general ease of learning.

    Whether it be on the contractor, wholesale or OEM level I would love to work a more fulfilling job where I feel useful to my employer. Any suggestions on where to start, what to study, who to contact, etc. is hugely appreciated!

    Sincerely,

    Francis

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Somerville nj
    Posts
    22
    What about a sales position? Im sure there are many places you can take some classes on HVAC. local college or any Vocational school. That might help with getting a better understanding of the things. Or maybe work as a dispatcher. No matter what position you take any class is always a plus.

    BCMech

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    141
    Thanks for your input and forgive my ignorance; what do salespeople actually do at the contractor level? Are they the ones going out for estimates, load calcs etc.?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston TX
    Posts
    873
    Phrancis- They sell work, contracts and equipment. Judging by what you said your good at, that is a good start. You have to also be detail orientated (big time). There are a lot of sales sluts out there who don't care about their customers or the people they are employed with, only the almighty dollar. I will be honest it won't be easy work as too many customers are price shopping only and not concerned with job quality. Good luck to you. GEO
    Once in a while everything falls into place and I am able to move forward, most of the time it just falls all over the place and I can't go anywhere-GEO

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    6,007
    What about a maintenance position?

    Maybe starting out without having to build and or fixanything could end up helping you become more familiar around equipment and maybe better with your hands.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    6,336
    Sales or commercial controls/energy management

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    141
    Those all sound like good options. Any idea where one would start? Books, courses, anything? What about controls and energy management? Any degree required, e.g. Engineering or any such thing?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Dublin, CA
    Posts
    121
    I'm kind of confused by what you mean in regards to being bad with your hands. A disability of some kind? I have never found this line of work to require much in the way of manual precision. Everything's metal, copper, and rubber. Pretty durable stuff in general. I wouldn't be afraid to try it out.

    Sorry I'm not much more help, I've learned 95% of what I know from on-the-job experience so I don't really know how others do the school stuff. I'm working on the NATE Certification but I don't think that's what you're looking for. Maybe check it out and see what you think?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Indianapolis indiana
    Posts
    45
    ServiceNet is a PITA to deal with.

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