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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by Makinhole View Post
    Is there any chance the low pressure safety switch is doing its job and warning you of a low incoming gas situation? I have fixed a few Bryant furnaces by adjusting the lp pressure starting at the regulator coming out of the lp tank, and then resetting the gas pressures and temperature rise by strictly adhering to the instillation instructions. Find out what the incoming gas pressure is and go from there. Good luck.
    Well that's a good point - I've never been super-clear on exactly what the Low pressure code is referring to, but I thought it had to do with pressure in the combustion chamber (i.e. pressure from the inducer fan), not anything to do with gas pressure.

    This is the only gas appliance and the whole setup from the meter to the furnace was installed new.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,721
    Quote Originally Posted by gravity View Post
    Good call tedkidd.
    (Thanks Gravity, I can't take credit. It happened to my buddy Shortcircuit and he reminded me.)

    Where is the combustion air intake? How tight is the house?

    Some houses are tight enough the act of opening a door could cause a problem if the CAI is not properly piped to outside.
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    43
    I wouldn't think the house is super tight, it was built in 1944.

    Not sure exactly what you mean by "where"... it's in that vent kit I linked earlier, on the middle of the side of the house, a couple feet off the ground. It's maybe 10-15 feet from the neighbor's house, so it's not exactly a wind tunnel. But yeah the intake and exhaust definitely go outside.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,721
    The vent pipes run about 6 feet diagonally up, then horizontally (with a noticeable "arch") about 10-12 feet out a side wall. It does vent into a space maybe 10-15 ft wide between mine and the neighbor's house (not near a corner though), so I guess it's possible some weird wind action could happen there.
    Any chance water is pooling in vent pipe?
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    43
    From looking at the pipes, it doesn't seem likely, although I guess if there's a restriction at the vent end it's possible.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    I would think a pipe restriction would also trip it on hi stage as well as medium or low stage, unless these fans "Fall off" their fan curves at low speed and gernate a lot more static pressure at high speed. But I was pretty usure they used some kind of reverse inclined blade that has a wide performace range.

    I'm probably overthinking this. I'd try and rule out electrical some how, or try opening and closing entry doors and see if it trips then.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,003
    There is just enough faults of both the low pressure switch and flame sense to seem to indicate that maybe gas pressure settings may not be correct as these are in some instances related as is a venting issue with either sizing, slope (collecting water) or wind issues. The proximity of the two houses can cause strange wind patterns even with relatively light winds. My house and garage are 12' apart and a slight wind from the north creates a virtual wind tunnel effect between them. The low pressure switch is going to be more sensitive to wind pressures on it. Even a blocked condensate drain can cause the issues you're seeing. Are you using natural gas or LP gas?

    Best suggestion I can give is to have your installer's senior tech (the one most familiar with your specific model of furnace) come out and go over the install and settings on your system to verify that everything is set to factory specs.
    Use the biggest hammer you like, pounding a square peg into a round hole does not equal a proper fit.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,721
    Are you at the end of your street?
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,378
    That is not an approved vent termination for that furnace. It can cause venting issues

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by comfortdoc View Post
    That is not an approved vent termination for that furnace. It can cause venting issues
    Thanks Comfortdoc, that's great info.

    I don't want to be a pain, but do you know where I could find something to back that up? I would like to have something more than "some guy on the internet said..." when I bring this up with the contractor.

    Re: the other comments: It's Natural Gas. I'm not on the end of my street - we're in the middle of a semi-urban street grid, although the gas line is a little suspect because there's been a gas pipe terminating next to the house for as long as I've lived here, but as far as I'm aware there's never been any gas *in* the house until we put the furnace in, so that gas pipe sat unused for unknown decades. However... when the gas guy came to set the meter, I watched him test the pressure with a 3-foot long column of (water?), so presumably the pressure is good.

    Opening and closing doors - it often happens at night, so that seems unlikely.

    On one of the previous visits the tech fiddled with the gas metering valve while monitoring some kind of dial gauge, combustion chamber pressure perhaps? It's been a while so I don't really remember clearly.

    How would you guys recommend I go about convincing the contractor to get the manufacturer involved in troubleshooting, call and talk to "the boss"? I don't want to turn this into an adversarial relationship, especially considering that I've just gone beyond the 1-year labor warranty.

    Thanks again for all the thoughts and advice.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by tedkidd View Post
    You should also clear the history codes in the stat as well.
    Ted, I just noticed this comment.. is there any point to clearing the codes other than avoiding any confusion about what happened before or after the remediation steps? I've been letting them accumulate so I have "proof" to show the contractor.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,721
    Good point.

    I'm not sure clearing the codes matters other than avoiding confusion.

    I like taking pictures of things, film is so cheap these days!
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA
    Posts
    1,378
    The Product Data Sheet and Installation instructions list the aapproved termination kits. It seems you have had enough visits from the dealer to reasonably request a visit from the distributor's tech rep. If they will not call 1-8000-CARRIER

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