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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
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    2,701
    Quote Originally Posted by 545GAlady View Post
    I would like to wonder why they are rectangle. I think one of the reasons why is because the registers are installed right by the windows.
    That is where a rectangle register should be. Round diffusers would be installed more towards the middle of the room since the "throw" is 180 degrees. Super great for A/C and quiet operation.

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by George2 View Post
    That is where a rectangle register should be. Round diffusers would be installed more towards the middle of the room since the "throw" is 180 degrees. Super great for A/C and quiet operation.
    I think that according to code around here registers in rooms with windows must be located by the window. One of the registers in our basement system (one in theater room) is one of those 3 cone t-bar diffusers and it does a great job in both heating and cooling.

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
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    2,701
    Quote Originally Posted by 545GAlady View Post
    I would like to wonder why they are rectangle. I think one of the reasons why is because the registers are installed right by the windows and also since the fact that when these homes are built, the builders don't want to spend so much money on air registers.
    I've heard of many codes over the years but never one that addresses register placement. They might want to worry about more important issues in Georgia regarding HVAC.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,302
    IMHO the optimum placement for registers is less important than reducing the total amount of ductwork in unconditioned space. if that means sidewall registers on interior walls so be it.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,701
    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    IMHO the optimum placement for registers is less important than reducing the total amount of ductwork in unconditioned space. if that means sidewall registers on interior walls so be it.
    10-4. If it were to design the ductwork for my new home (if I were building one) I would install all of my ductwork within the conditioned space.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    I really do like the registers we currently have.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
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    2,701
    Quote Originally Posted by 545GAlady View Post
    I really do like the registers we currently have.
    I knew there had to be something you liked about the system.
    Last edited by George2; 12-04-2012 at 11:52 PM. Reason: highlighted a word

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,732
    Man, you and Florida Joy are going to be more knowledgable and qualified than 90% of the sales guys out there.

    If you get a new thermostat it would be nice if it had a data logging feature (like my ecobees). Seeing how the equipment, indoor and outdoor temps interconnect is really useful.

    I suspect locking your furnace on low stage will help.

    Btw, who defined your insulation as "OK"? That type of undefined descriptor makes me question their competence, much less qualification. Inches or rated r value are measurements that have meaning to us. OK doesn't.
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    Its been considered a good practice since central heating plants and distributed heat came to be that radiators then later forced air supplies were placed under windows to reduce the feeling of drafts. More of an issue with single pane glass that modern thermal panes. Before that you had fireplaces that radiated most of the heat. You also had gravity furnaces with interior ducts.But it had limits as well. My home has about 40 windows. Some are in sets but even then i only had 18 radiators so about 1/3 of the windows didn't have radiators under them. I do wish the hack company that installed the forced air system had installed 18 supplies.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,302
    IMHO the fewer number of supplies the better. Less ductwork losses. Of course supplies must be placed in the room correctly to get proper distribution. And I will never figure out why Installers put a register right over where the bed is "designed to be" in a master bedroom..

  11. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    As I mentioned about the air not being that cold in COOL mode in one of my earlier posts on this thread, I did forget to mention that there's air that's leaking out in the middle of the coil. Could that be affecting the temperature of the air by causing the hot air in the attic to enter the coil?

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by tedkidd View Post
    Man, you and Florida Joy are going to be more knowledgable and qualified than 90% of the sales guys out there.

    If you get a new thermostat it would be nice if it had a data logging feature (like my ecobees). Seeing how the equipment, indoor and outdoor temps interconnect is really useful.

    I suspect locking your furnace on low stage will help.

    Btw, who defined your insulation as "OK"? That type of undefined descriptor makes me question their competence, much less qualification. Inches or rated r value are measurements that have meaning to us. OK doesn't.
    I enjoy learning more about HVAC!

    The sales consultant evaluated all the insulation and he said that there was enough of it. Apparently I don't think he was really checking it that well. I also don't remember him telling me what the r value or how many inches of insulation there really is. It makes me wonder.... I should really call someone who knows how to PROPERLY evaluate insulation!

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,732
    Comprehensive home assessment time. Isn't Allison Bailes in Atlanta? If he can't do it maybe he can suggest someone.
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

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