Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    49

    Burried Lineset??

    What is the best way to burry a line set? I am doing some planning for my rebuild and because of the size of the new HE condensers it looks like one will need to be situated away from the house if the inside position for the furnace need to go on that side of the house. We may need to create an island garden for it. Maybe 15' from the house.

    Other than making sure no one hits the line set with a shovel after it is buried ............ what are the problems with doing this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,586
    Varies slightly with weather the evap is above or below the condenser. But migration can be a problem. And cause liquid flood back. A few devices can be added to protect the compressor.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    49
    Looks like the evaporator would be a tad lower then the condenser -- we are going to be digging out an existing crawlspace for radon issues and I am hoping that we can get it to a usable depth to install an upright unit vs a horizontal .. even with a horizontal furnace I think it would still be a couple of feet lower.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,036
    Your HVAC contractor should be able to get all of the information from the manufacturer along with their blessing (in writing preferably) on how the system should be installed. Without that, I'd be concerned with any warranty issues down the road especially if another contractor would be involved with future service.
    Use the biggest hammer you like, pounding a square peg into a round hole does not equal a proper fit.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SE Washington
    Posts
    559
    run it in schedule 40 pvc for protection
    Total Energy Management, inc

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Spokane, Washington
    Posts
    124
    This is the Ask Our Pro's forum. In order to post a response here, you must have verified qualifications and have been approved by the AOP Committee. You may ask a question by starting a new thread.

    You can find the rules for posting and qualifications here.

    Additional infractions may result in loss of posting privileges.
    Last edited by jpsmith1cm; 01-10-2013 at 01:12 PM. Reason: non AOP member

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,867
    Helioson

    This is the Ask Our Pro's forum. In order to post a response here, you must have verified qualifications and have been approved by the AOP Committee. You may ask a question by starting a new thread.

    You can find the rules for posting and qualifications here.

    Additional infractions may result in loss of posting privileges.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    Quote Originally Posted by isuredo View Post
    run it in schedule 40 pvc for protection

    And much, much easier future replacement when needed.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    49
    What kind of warranty issues could come into play? Can you get any noise if the line set is in a conduit? I have asked so many questions because I am rebuilding an old stone structure located in a historic district with a review board -- so even the location of vents will have to be reviewed .....let alone something the size of a washing machine sitting outside. Previously both units were located in the rear of the structure with two big supply lines buried in the ground to bring heat and AC to the front of the structure from one of the units. I would like to move one of the units to the front -- but I need to find both the furnace and condenser a suitable home. I am trying to think through the possible solutions -- pro/con and $$.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SE Washington
    Posts
    559
    evry manufacture has a published acceptable lineset length and appropriate add ons when using what they term, a long lineset. How its run is up to installer and other then requirements when its above or below the evaporator, you can run/place it in just about anything, pvc pipe is a standard for burying a lineset, it has to be protected ( cant just bury it in direct contact with ground), good luck with your project and please call a professional who can help design this to work correctly
    Total Energy Management, inc

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,036
    Warranty coverage is always limited. Part of the limiting wording has to do with "installed according to manufacturer's specifications" which is why I originally suggested that you find out what the manufacturer recommends for this type of installation and if what you are thinking of doing. If it isn't spelled out verbatim and you can't get someone to give you a written, dated and signed variance of approval move on to an option that is or can be.

    What kind of issues could come into play? That's a hard question to answer because it depends on who is making the call on whether it's a covered issue or not. Bottom line is, the wording of most warranties includes the basic "warning" if the system is not installed according to the manufacturer's specifications and/or recommendations the warranty "could" be void.

    One quick and simple search on the internet with a manufacturer's name and the works "buried lineset" came up with this wording on the very last page of the product data sheet for one of this company's AC units.

    "If any refrigerant tubing is buried, provide a 6 in. (152.4 mm) vertical rise to the valve connections at the unit. Refrigerant tubing
    lengths up to 36 in. (914.4 mm) may be buried without further consideration. Do not bury refrigerant lines longer than 36 in. (914.4
    mm)."

    The "may be buried without further consideration" MAY MEAN that if you check with them they may authorize it, but only because of the word "consideration" being used. Honestly though, that's just a guess.
    Use the biggest hammer you like, pounding a square peg into a round hole does not equal a proper fit.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    49
    Interesting --- So why does the line set care if it is in the ground or not? I'm wondering what is actually changing with the operation of the AC/ Heat pump when the line set is buried. My house is going to be rebuilt by a local builder using one of his subcontractors -- the builder has a great reputation and his work is quite spectacular .. so I'm reasonably confident that my HVAC will be installed correctly. I installed a zoned Carrier/ Bryant Infinity furnace/ AC around 6 years ago into another house that was already zoned and it has worked so well I want to do the same with the two new units in this place -- except with heat pumps. The place is basically gutted so the HVAC will be completely new with redesigned ductwork. But, this place has challenges and I am trying to understand the possible benefits and pitfalls of various layouts. I have noticed condenser units placed away from buildings -- so the line sets must be buried -- but I have no experience ever living in a place with them. I would not what to do this only to have some strange noise and be told "Oh they always do that when we burry them". I am actually going to need to produce a drawing with the proposed condenser locations illustrated so the Historic Architectural Review Board can see and approve the locations -- not a cheap process. So by asking some questions I can educate myself to possible unforeseen problems. The furnace will not be far off the inside wall -- so I don't think the line set would even be 20'. Whatever I do I want the 10 year parts/ labor from Carrier .. as I have on the other unit. Have used it twice this past year.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,720
    For one the ground acts like a heat exchanger and will keep the pipes cold and cause liquid refrigerant migration causing oil and slugging issuesd. Another is you will have to incorporate risers for proper oil return being lineset is below condenser. That is why it is suggested using pvc to insulate pipe from cold ground and corrosiveness of ground.
    My name is TooCoolforschool and I am a chronic over charger.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event