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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    82
    i set my tstat at 71* during the day, 68* at night, but my house doesn't feel as warm as others i've been in that are also set at 71*. the RH is 42%, anybody have any ideas as to what i should be looking into?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rochester, MN
    Posts
    5,304
    What do you have for heating equipment?

    You said 42% humidity, is that your home?

    Avg run time?

    Do you have another thermomer to compair temp?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Zelienople, Pa
    Posts
    2,965
    A mental evaluation! J/K!!!

    71 is 71. If a house has higher or lower humidity than yours, that can make a difference in how 71 feels...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    NW burbs of Detroit
    Posts
    6,058
    Drafts. Stratifacation. Insulation quality.

    All this stuff goes to comfort.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    230
    Did you walk over to the others?
    Sorry
    My post is sarcastic. Just couldn't resist.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    1,918
    Fishin,

    Google on the psychrometic chart. It will explain more the comfort level. And skip all the headache from us.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304

    Couple reasons for feeling cold

    Another thing which affects some houses -- the thermostat may be in error or located on a wall which misrepresents the actual house temperature. My own house has some unusual construction which sure looks pretty but causes the thermostat to think it's located on an exterior wall. Measuring the wall temperature with an infrared thermometer tells me in cold weather this wall is chronically several degrees colder than other interior walls. You might have a thermostat problem like mine, or some other measurement problem.

    Another thing I have observed is master bathroom being 4 degrees cooler than the thermostat. I am a homeowner not a pro and am still trying to get a handle on that situation. In some houses at least, the room-by-room heating loads are not in proportion to the cooling loads. If the duct system is sized right for cooling then you cannot help but have a winter problem with temperature variation between rooms. Just throwing this out, not at all thinking this is your problem.

    Best of luck -- Pstu

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    42
    There could definitely be a difference between what your old stat and your new stat think is 71 degrees. I had a new furnace, A/C, and Honeywell stat installed in 2005. I set it to the same temps as my old stat. I was cold all winter, always turning up the setting. This summer, I was cold as well.

    I finally decided to compare the room temp that my new stat was registering with an independent thermometer as well as my old stat. I just put batteries in my old stat and set it to 'Off'. I used my old stat since I knew that I liked the settings on it. I put the thermometer and old stat near the new stat. When the new stat was showing 72 degrees, the old stat and thermometer were showing 70 degrees.

    I have a very nice Honeywell stat that allows me to vary the readout by plus/minus 3 degrees so I programmed it to change the offset by 2 degrees. I had not thought that this would even be an issue since I assumed the new 'digital' sensor would be very accurate. If this is your problem and you cannot adjust with an offset, you can just bump the setting to xx degrees to get the temperature that you are used to. Good luck.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    45
    Like some people already said the way the house is insulated is where you might feel a difference... Humidity has an effact as well... But try using a differant thermometer to make sure theres nothing wrong with your t-stat..

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    and take the same thermometer with you when you visit to compare.Very hard to compare different houses. If you're not comfy at 71 in your house,adjust the t-stat till you are.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  11. #11
    The type of heating will certainly affect this.
    A house with baseboard or in-floor radiant, set at 71F, will feel much warmer than a house with gas/oil forced air set at same temperature, which will feel warmer than a house with an air/air HP at same temperature.
    People say 71 is 71 but I say bollocks... If the system moves the air at a certain speed it will feel colder, if it moves the air even faster, it will feel colder still. It's called windchill. And even if the distribution system is perfect on a forced air system, there is still air moving from the supplies to the returns even if the vents aren't pointing 'at you.'
    As was stated, check the actual temps in the actual rooms with a thermometer. Don't go by the thermostat. It may be in a bad location or be inaccurate. Be sure to compare apples to apples, like heating systems.
    As was stated, insulation and drafts play a huge roll. If the room temp is 71 but the window you are sitting next to has a huge leak, it will feel cold! Even a cold wall will make you feel cold even though the 'average' temp in the house is fine.
    Also if it's forced air and the system is oversized, it will 1) blow more air over the same time, increasing velocity and 'windchill' and 2) run less therefore leaving some rooms cold while satisfying other rooms.
    If you have gas/oil there is some flexibility in slowing the blower but this is best left to a tech that can assess the distribution system as well as the heat rise of the heat exchanger. You have to stay in tolerance.

    [Edited by fortressofcomfort on 11-06-2006 at 01:41 PM]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    82
    the tstat is correct in it's reading and location. the heating system is a 92% gas unit. i questioned it being oversized since the load cal says 64k and the unit is 100k instead of 75k the hvac guy says that's what needed to work with 3.5 ton ac. i thought about the air infilltration, the attic has r-38 cellulose, it may have settled some? anyone heard on blowing fiberglass over cellulose? i looked at the psychrometic chart and don't understand it at all.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    244
    I would say drafts is the main culprit. I live in a house with 2x4 outside walls and no housewrap. Though not felt as like you would expect drafts to feel like, it can make your 71 feel colder.
    SRJ

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