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  1. #1

    Time to replace furnace, heat exchanger or do nothing ?

    During an annual furnace tune up, the technician observed the CO reading was 75. He told me that it was still below the 100 mark so there's no cause for alarm. But the higher CO reading is caused by an aging heat exchanger that rusts over time. The unit, a Carrier 58MVP080-14 propane furnace, is 13 years old. The heat exchanger is not cracked. The unit has and still performs well. Aside from annual tune ups and routine filter changes, the unit has never given me any trouble. The tech however recommended that they send out a "comfort analyst" to evaluate the home and replacement should be considered. Replacement of the heat exchanger was discouraged due to the age of the unit.

    I'm pretty sure I could replace the heat exchanger myself but I'm wondering if I should. Should I do anything? Or should I consider replacement?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Altmar, New York, United States
    Posts
    4,309
    Quote Originally Posted by gmalandr View Post
    During an annual furnace tune up, the technician observed the CO reading was 75. He told me that it was still below the 100 mark so there's no cause for alarm. But the higher CO reading is caused by an aging heat exchanger that rusts over time. The unit, a Carrier 58MVP080-14 propane furnace, is 13 years old. The heat exchanger is not cracked. The unit has and still performs well. Aside from annual tune ups and routine filter changes, the unit has never given me any trouble. The tech however recommended that they send out a "comfort analyst" to evaluate the home and replacement should be considered. Replacement of the heat exchanger was discouraged due to the age of the unit.

    I'm pretty sure I could replace the heat exchanger myself but I'm wondering if I should. Should I do anything? Or should I consider replacement?
    get another contractor asap! and a reputable one. you shouldn't be getting co because the hx has rust. rust doesn't produce co or leak co. it's coming from somewhere. generally we change the entire furnace, at 13 years a new hx isn't worth the money. now's the time to upgrade. many, many options.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    4,923
    Quote Originally Posted by gmalandr View Post
    During an annual furnace tune up, the technician observed the CO reading was 75. He told me that it was still below the 100 mark so there's no cause for alarm. But the higher CO reading is caused by an aging heat exchanger that rusts over time. The unit, a Carrier 58MVP080-14 propane furnace, is 13 years old. The heat exchanger is not cracked. The unit has and still performs well. Aside from annual tune ups and routine filter changes, the unit has never given me any trouble. The tech however recommended that they send out a "comfort analyst" to evaluate the home and replacement should be considered. Replacement of the heat exchanger was discouraged due to the age of the unit.

    I'm pretty sure I could replace the heat exchanger myself but I'm wondering if I should. Should I do anything? Or should I consider replacement?
    You should not attempt to replace a heat exchanger yourself, nor will you be able to obtain one through conventional means.

    9 years in the industry, I'm not exactly confident replacing them.

    That model doesn't "crack" in a normal sense. It rusts out in the secondary.
    That secondary is a POS. We just ran across a 3 year old payne that rust'd out.
    "Better tell the sandman to stay away, because we're gonna be workin on this one all night."

    "Dude, you need more than 2 wires to a condenser to run a 2 stage heatpump."

    "Just get it done son."

    Dad adjusted

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    nebraska
    Posts
    1,629
    Leave it alone for now and start saving for a new furnace, could be several years before needing replaced. Make sure to get the annual service done in the fall so when the bad news comes you have time to get bids and do some home work instead of a panic buy in the coldest portion of winter.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Upstate Central NY
    Posts
    579
    Cleaning the burners and adjusting the setup will probably reduce the CO. Call a reputable company.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Springville, NY
    Posts
    2,686
    CO in LP could be as simple as rusty burners and low gas pressure.

    I'd get a second opinion. Besides, what's your warranty paperwork say about the heat exchanger? It's not hard to replace and the unit is only slightly beyond 1/2 of its predicted lifespan.
    ~~
    Nest is poo...

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