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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Nashville,Tn
    Posts
    30
    Yes sir! Well, for a clog yes, for the right size orfice-no.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Nashville,Tn
    Posts
    30
    I tried getting the size today @ Carrier so I could match it up with what was on there but the counter guy couldn't find it so I just left it alone for the time.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Nashville,Tn
    Posts
    30
    Thank you and congrats on your up and coming. My wife and I waited until he came out. What an awesome experience to have!

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    4,036
    i sent you 2 pdfs. one shows the correct way to mount the burners. maybe they got flipped. the other one shows the flue baffle.

    i'm thinking flame impingement of misaligned burners or gas needs to go up or down.

    you said originally the nipples arent even. the slightest offset could mess everything up. i would make sure 100% the burners are lined up perfect.

    also might need the flue baffle with such a small heat exchanger

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    4,036
    orifice is 38 (.101)

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    wedged in freezer shelf
    Posts
    6,788
    What about the oil burning off the outside of the HX? That's my guess anyway.
    “If You Can Dodge A Wrench You Can Dodge A Ball”

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    4,036
    so we've gone to all this about the furnace, have we tested to see if the furnace is actually producing over 100ppm CO?

    Maybe he got CO from car running in the garage?

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Nashville,Tn
    Posts
    30
    Yes, that got burned off already.

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Nashville,Tn
    Posts
    30
    there CO was going off audibly at 125ppm and and mine would get up there around 60 and 70 then I would stop monitoring at that point. Nothing else is running to produce the gas.

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    4,036
    how would the furnace flue gases get into the home?

    you are allowed by ANSI standards to have 400ppm CO airfree or "CO(0)" in the exhaust. I was trained CO under 100ppm undiluted, which I've been able to achieve on every appliance.

    so if your under 100ppm CO in the flue then your good. Now you need to figure out how its getting into the home.

    opened windows? blower door has a gap? heat exchanger not sealed around air gaps? have car started in garage? they cleaned the electric over and didn't ventilate the home?

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    5,632
    If you think the CO is coming from this unit, it really needs to have a combustion analysis done, because it is producing way too much CO.


    Here is an explanation by Jim Davis about how much CO the unit has to produce, to get any CO inside the structure.


    A 100,000 btu furnace uses 25 cfm of air for complete combustion. Furnace blower in heating move 1300 cfm on draft induced and 1500 cfm on condensing.

    If you mixed 100% of the flue gasses with 1500 cfm how much CO would you have to be making to get a reading of 10ppm?

    25cfm is .016% of the mixture, therefore the furnace would have to be making over 600ppm which exceeds the 400ppm "air free" they are allowed.

    The furnace would have to be red-tagged without a hole or crack.

    That is dumping 100% of the flue gasses into the airstream. A crack may under certain conditions may leak say 2% of the 25 cfm or say .5 cfm. .5 cfm is .003% of 1500ppm.

    So to read 10ppm of CO in the airstream, the furnace would have to be making over 3000ppm of CO.

    Even without the blower running the volume of air in the plenum versus the volume of air from a leak would be still be quite diluted
    .


    Bottom line: To get measureable CO in a space an appliance,or vehicle, has to be making seriously high levels of CO, or it has to have been made over long periods of run time.
    Instead of learning the tricks of the trade, learn the trade.

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Columbia, MD
    Posts
    4,036
    you always have good info.

    thanks

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Nashville,Tn
    Posts
    30
    thank you for your info. I will do some more research. I will tell you this, if I stick my fluke CO monitor at the flue exhaust it will peg out at a thousand ppm. It will burn your eyes.

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