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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    17
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    Rudd Issues (Bad Install)

    So to introduce myself, I work on industrial refrigeration systems (200 ton chillers and 20-60 ton point of use systems) not much residential. A few weeks ago had one of my master bedroom AFI breakers trip. I reset it, and most morning for the next week I woke up with a tripped breaker. I made sure nothing was on the circuit and was still having issue with it tripping. Well I planned to replace it but put it off. I then noticed my main 2.5 ton unit was failing to start. I check the capacitor for the herm and it was pretty low. Threw a new capacitor in and went start it up and noticed a big flash where the wires for my compressor go through the knock out from the control panel area to the open condenser. Checked it out and no grommet was used and the wire was shorting on the knockout hole. So I fixed it and buttoned everything up, and it worked great. Stopped the AFI from tripping too. Also saw the last tech had bent the test pins together on the defrost board, so I went ahead and isolated them (previous home-owner).

    2 weeks later I was woken to a stalled compressor buzzing. I switched the thermo to emergency heat and left the heat-strips on until I had time to look at the unit. So I checked the cap again, and looked good, then checked the resistance of the compressor and everything looked good. I think low and mid readings added up to around 3 ohms which is what my high reading was. Everything was ground isolated and seemed fine. The unit always had a hard start sound, so I threw a hard start kit on. Fired up fine, amp draw looked good, around 75 in-rush. Also voltage was around 240. Started it up a few time and was fine, did have a small new vibration to it, so my expectations were fairly low.... Woke up next day and breaker had tripped....

    Went straight to the compressor and checked resistance and through my start winding it was over 300ohms. So no good... I really dug into the unit to see what else might have caused the failure and found the capillary tube on the TXV by the reversing valve was also rubbing on something and rubbed all the way through.

    So would it be pretty safe to assume the shorting of the start winding and possibly the TXV not operating on the reversing valve led to premature compressor failure? I think the MFG date was 2010 on the unit. My expectations were pretty low when I put that hard start kit and felt a slight vibration. It just re-assured my assumption of a mechanical failure in the compressor.

    Also its a 2.5 ton 13 SEER 410A with a matched AHU. I should be fine if I go with any 2.5 ton 13 SEER 410A condenser correct?

    I really hate it, because this was the newer of the two units I have. The other is a builder grade 10 SEER R22 unit that I have fought the last 2 summers in July. I planned to change both the condenser and ahu this spring, but looks that that will be put on hold.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    9,350
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    Rheem had trouble with sensing bulbs breaking at one point. That's lilely what caused the untimely murder of the compressor. Since its a heat pump Id get a condenser matches to the indoor unit. Any hp would work but not as well as one it's designed to work with.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bristol Va.
    Posts
    920
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    parts not under warranty?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DOGBOY View Post
    parts not under warranty?
    Yes, parts are under warranty. A free compressor with odd and ends and labor from a Rheem or Copeland certified reseller will cost the same to me as a condenser. I need to check if my supplier can do a RMA for Rheem or Copeland, but most likely not...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Anderson, South Carolina, United States
    Posts
    9,350
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK1 View Post
    Yes, parts are under warranty. A free compressor with odd and ends and labor from a Rheem or Copeland certified reseller will cost the same to me as a condenser. I need to check if my supplier can do a RMA for Rheem or Copeland, but most likely not...
    Being in the business I'm sure you can find a rheem/rhuud dealer or Distributer willing to get the parts for you. As long as you have the tools and a stick of silfos to do the work you could have it up an running in no time.
    Heating/Cooling Services Inc.
    www.andersonhvacservice.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bristol Va.
    Posts
    920
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtrammel View Post
    Being in the business I'm sure you can find a rheem/rhuud dealer or Distributer willing to get the parts for you. As long as you have the tools and a stick of silfos to do the work you could have it up an running in no time.
    I kinda assumed that you would be doing the work yourself. That would cut costs a lot.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    75
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    That very problem (TXV cap tube on outdoor coil) happened to me three times this fall. All were small-ish (3-5 ton) Trane heat pump RTUs. One killed the compressor completely (and the resulting carnage destroyed the reversing valve) and the other 2 seemed to have been that way for a while. I figured we've had a colder than normal winter for around here, and with the outdoor TXV clamped off due to lack of sensing bulb pressure, they weren't showing any problems in cool (due to the check valve), but pumped down into low pressure shutdown in heating mode.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    EXIT 16W www.wmtandson.com
    Posts
    4,421
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    why did you post (BAD INSTALL)
    DON"T mess with the US
    I thought I had been there and done That.
    ITS ALL ABOUT LEARNIN!
    I thought it would be better by now
    "He who works with his hands is a laborer.
    He who works with his hands & his head is a craftsman.
    He who works with his hands, his head & his heart is an artist."
    ~St. Francis of Assisi

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    17
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    The installed failed to use a grommet, I know RUDD prolly should have had one in there, but anyone installing the unit should have seen those wires would have eventually chaffed and shorted. Being in industrial maintenance this is a HUGE issue no matter what the equipment. Also the installer also should have seen the capillary tube rubbing against the compressor.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    2,949
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    Being in industrial maintenance. You should have noticed the problems yourself before it led to compressor failure!

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