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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    6
    We are going to be building a new house with a detached garage and are wondering what would be the best heat[most economical].
    This will not be our main garage, but my husband wants to have some heat. We will have shade in the summer, so he is not so concerned about cooling.
    The garage will be 38x30 and will have wet spray cellulose insulation.
    I would really appreciate any and all help please.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    6
    Anyone?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Grottoes VA
    Posts
    5,856
    In-floor radient in the slab. Cheap to operate and very comfortable. That's what I will be installing.
    Karst means cave. So, I search for caves.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    6
    Thanks Karst. I have heard about this type of heat, but am under the impression it is very expensive to install?
    Can you tell me what company you will choose.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    "Cheapest" heat would be a unit heater hung from the ceiling. Low initial cost and low maintenance.

    Something better would be a tube style radiant heater. There are models designed for low ceiling residential applications. These warm the objects within the space, not just the air. The equipment is more expensive than a traditional unit heater, but they can be cheaper to operate over time. No air movement, so circulating dust issues are not a problem. More stable temperatures and a slower recovery rate.

    In slab radiant heat would be the best because it will warm the concrete floor and the objects within the space. The simplest closed system would be the tubing, a manifold, a pump and a plain old water heater filled with a glycol solution. The recovery rate is very slow, so it needs to be on almost all the time (you could not leave it off and get heat on demand like with a unit heater or the overhead tube radiant). This system will be more expensive than the others- I would at least get the tubing "roughed in" the slab and add the rest later. Foam and/or something with a refective radiant barrier under the concrete is a good idea.

    A conventional furnace would allow the addition of cooling.

    Any system needs to be designed with explosion hazards in mind- especially in a garage/workshop environment. Wood dust is just as explosive as gasoline or paint vapors.

    Be sure to do a load calc on the garage to keep the equipment properly sized and operating costs as low as possible. Two inch foam around the slab perimeter and caulked bottom plates will help.

    The only way to get pricing is to get bids from local contractors. Cost of ownership will exceed the cost of installation, so choose carefully.
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,597
    ductless heat pump, that way if you do need to cool in the future, you can.

    good luck.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Ft.Worth,Tx
    Posts
    4,584

    Heat for Garage

    Radiant Heaters for garages Fahrenheat Portable Radiant Heater 500Watt, 120 Volt
    ( In stock )
    Radiant heater is designed for supplemental indoor heating in residential and commercial areas such as garages, workshops, toll booths, loading and sh... More at Northern Tool $87.17
    Buy It
    at Northern Tool



    "Everyday above ground, is a good day".
    "But everyday that you have made a difference in someones life, may insure you stay above ground a little longer".<aircooled>

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    7,405
    I'm partial to the Modine "Hot Dawg". Here's a link:

    http://hot-dawg.modine.com/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    7,405

    Re: Heat for Garage

    Originally posted by aircooled53
    Radiant Heaters for garages Fahrenheat Portable Radiant Heater 500Watt, 120 Volt
    ( In stock )
    Radiant heater is designed for supplemental indoor heating in residential and commercial areas such as garages, workshops, toll booths, loading and sh... More at Northern Tool $87.17
    Buy It
    at Northern Tool



    Hmmm...500 Watts? $$$$$$$$

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,996
    You have to decide if you want to run the garage heat on LP, Nat gas, oil or electric. If your electric rates are low use the raidant lamps. An oil or gas direct vent space heater would be the next option as you'll be venting the fumes outdoors.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    6
    Thanks for all replies.
    Actually, our local power company [Amerin] is planning on raising electric rates 40% in January.
    Consumer groups are opposing it of course, but so far it looks like it will pass.
    I called about one type of heater [forgot name] and was told that because the garage was soo large, we would need 9 units?
    I just checked out the Hot-Dawg and it sounds good. I found one web site that sells them, but it was closed today.
    Any idea how many BTU's? We don't want it as warm as house...just enough to keep things from freezing.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    If you check out the "HVAC Calc" link at the top of the page, you can get a limited use license for not a whole lot of money to figure your heat load.
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    7,405
    Originally posted by neophytes serendipity
    If you check out the "HVAC Calc" link at the top of the page, you can get a limited use license for not a whole lot of money to figure your heat load.

    Hvac-calc work for garages? Don, can you give us some insight on that?

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