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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    10
    which of the online schools are any good? i have looked at pennfoster and pcdi.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    22
    I wouldn't suggest wasting your money on ANY school. Why pay money and invest your time and leave school with no real abilities or hands on experience? Find the best company in your area doing what you want to do in HVAC and ask if you can donate your time and ride as a helper with their best technicians. We offer this in Denver. It's great for you, you get real world experience, and the company gets some free help and might get first crack at a good service technician. If you want to come to Denver we'll mentor you.
    Mike Townsend

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    10

    Thumbs up school

    Thanks for the reply and that is what i am going to do with a friend that has his own business in hvac. i have my type1 certification already and i am going to get my type2 as soon as possible,that way i am ahead of the game!I will give some thought to your offer..

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Oxford, Georgia
    Posts
    234
    I wouldn't be so quick to discredit schools. Now I wouldn't recommend taking an online course, unless you can also pick up an apprenticeship position. There are some very good technical programs availible at community colleges. I am a student at a technical college in the metro Atlanta area. I spent this morning practicing oxyacetylene brazing, built a project that was tested and held 100 psi. I moved on to the next unit on service valves. Our lab has around 15 complete systems and about 500 sq.ft. of work stations dealing with the various components of residental and commercial systems. The course whether certificate, diploma or degree is about 70% hands on. I know that certain variables will not be present in the classroom that will be present in the field, but having training from a good school is a solid foundation for a technician.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    22
    Unfortunately I get guys from these programs all the time, and they don't even know that an air filter is directional, or the standard color coding on thermostat wiring, or how to properly clean a condenser coil, or how to clear a condensate drain, etc. These schools do a good job of teaching theory and some higher level functions, but routinely skip over day to day service call procedures and preventive maintenace which is where most guys are going to start. It is frustrating to get a guy who has a "degree" in HVAC but takes a month worth of training before you can trust him to do a P.M. properly and expects to make $20 p/h from the first day. And I have seen this dozens of times. A good service technician will be happy to teach you the same things and you don't have to take out a student loan to do it. Plus you might be at that $20 level after you've spent 3 months riding with them vs. 3 months in the classroom.
    Mike Townsend

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