Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678910 LastLast
Results 66 to 78 of 118
  1. #66
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by George2 View Post
    Let me put it this way, if I were teaching a class on what poor ductwork and the worst case of shoddy (sp?) workmanship looked like, all I would need to show them the pictures you provided.

    Most of the duct systems around here are Cadillacs compared to GA. I could not and would not try to compete against that. Any general contractor that allows that kind of work should be driven out of business.

    Enough of my rant.....sorry, it's not your fault. Your ceiling are low because of the huge round flex ductwork. Those large pipes that come off the plenum somehow feed the 17 registers to the 1st floor. I would love to see how that was accomplished. Boy!
    This means that I might have to find myself a new HVAC company to use because the company who installed the first floor Trane XR15 did not say anything about the ductwork. That certain company is not our main company that we use anyways. Uggh whoever installed the systems when the house was built better be out of business.

  2. #67
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    I don't want to go off topic so should I start a new thread about the other two systems?

  3. #68
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,482
    Quote Originally Posted by 545GAlady View Post
    When I said 7 inch I meant to say 7 foot! My mistake
    I knew what you meant to say.

  4. #69
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,482
    Quote Originally Posted by 545GAlady View Post
    This means that I might have to find myself a new HVAC company to use because the company who installed the first floor Trane XR15 did not say anything about the ductwork. That certain company is not our main company that we use anyways. Uggh whoever installed the systems when the house was built better be out of business.
    One reason I'm no longer in the business is because of the lack of integirty.

    The money (to be made) is in the equipment. Labor costs prohibit doing the work "the old fashion way." Most contractors do not know how to price a job based on equip., materials, labor, sub-contractors and overhead.

    Your ductwork, from one end of the house to the other, front to back, should have been all solid duct/pipe.

  5. #70
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    It's sad how pretty much every home around here has flex duct. I guess it's just the way they do it in Georgia. I don't even think they sell metal duct at big box stores around here like Home Depot and Lowes.

  6. #71
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,482
    Quote Originally Posted by 545GAlady View Post
    It's sad how pretty much every home around here has flex duct. I guess it's just the way they do it in Georgia. I don't even think they sell metal duct at big box stores around here like Home Depot and Lowes.
    That's sad because it costs the consumers in extra energy and maintenance cost, not to mention that the poor airflow reduces the life of the equipment (not until the customer pays maintenance costs before the thing dies for good).

  7. #72
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    4,635
    Quote Originally Posted by George2 View Post
    One reason I'm no longer in the business is because of the lack of integirty.
    Competitive disadvantage. The reason? Energy consumption is NOT transparent, so there is no way for the consumer to understand the additional cost. Kind of like cars before mileage ratings came into existence.

    And the "increased maintenance/decrease longevity" has little incentive to homeowners who think "I'm only staying 5 years, so an 8 year life expectancy doesn't cost me".

    I have faith those issues will change. But it will require energy transparency on the level that is beginning to happen in places like this: http://bit.ly/gainsvillegreen
    Which makes more sense to you?
    CONSERVATION - turning your thermostat back and being uncomfortable. Maybe saving 5-10%
    ENERGY EFFICIENCY - leaving your thermostat where everyone is comfortable. Saving 30-70%

    DO THE NUMBERS! Step on a HOMESCALE.
    What is comfort? Well, it AIN'T just TEMPERATURE!

    Energy Obese? An audit is the next step - go to BPI.org, or RESNET, and find an auditor near you.

  8. #73
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    I was wondering about the airflow and since the air handler is a 1.5 ton, would another return really be worth it because 1.5 ton air handlers usually have low cfm? How will having another large return affect airflow? Thanks in advanced.

  9. #74
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    new york
    Posts
    572
    Quote Originally Posted by 545GAlady View Post
    It's sad how pretty much every home around here has flex duct. I guess it's just the way they do it in Georgia. I don't even think they sell metal duct at big box stores around here like Home Depot and Lowes.
    Yes sad on flex duct. In uTha we can only run 15 feet flext duct. Out here we run full metal everything. except crawl space and attic. Basement truck line and metal round pipe. All old school out here.

  10. #75
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,482
    Quote Originally Posted by 545GAlady View Post
    I was wondering about the airflow and since the air handler is a 1.5 ton, would another return really be worth it because 1.5 ton air handlers usually have low cfm? How will having another large return affect airflow? Thanks in advanced.
    Welcome back. Reread post #21. If you want comfort in the basement, you need to add more (or larger) supplies and more (or larger) returns.

  11. #76
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    Thanks for the input. The only thing I'm kinda worried about is if we ever had the 6 inch supply in the game room upsized to an 8 inch, would that decrease the airflow coming out of the 8 inch supply in the theater room? Will the airflow also be affected if more returns and supplies were added to the basement? Thanks again in advance.

  12. #77
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,482
    Quote Originally Posted by 545GAlady View Post
    Thanks for the input. The only thing I'm kinda worried about is if we ever had the 6 inch supply in the game room upsized to an 8 inch, would that decrease the airflow coming out of the 8 inch supply in the theater room? Will the airflow also be affected if more returns and supplies were added to the basement? Thanks again in advance.
    A system needs the proper amount of return air so that it is able to "push" the supply. I have always used the anology (sp?) of a garden hose. If there is a kink in the hose, the water will just trickle out. We deal with the movement of air (which is invisible), so it's not easily understood.

    If there are too many supplies it will reduce the airflow. That is the reason for dampers in the pipes so that one can "balance" the air to the area(s) needed.

    Before long, with all your questions, you'll know more than 80% of the HVAC salesman and service techs out there.

  13. #78
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    373
    Quote Originally Posted by George2 View Post
    A system needs the proper amount of return air so that it is able to "push" the supply. I have always used the anology (sp?) of a garden hose. If there is a kink in the hose, the water will just trickle out. We deal with the movement of air (which is invisible), so it's not easily understood.

    If there are too many supplies it will reduce the airflow. That is the reason for dampers in the pipes so that one can "balance" the air to the area(s) needed.

    Before long, with all your questions, you'll know more than 80% of the HVAC salesman and service techs out there.
    Thank you for the info. I appreciate it. So basically a system short on returns will not provide that proper airflow needed.

    Having too many supplies is not really a good idea, especially if you don't have the correct number of returns. I'm starting to get the idea now. The system needs to have the correct amount of supplies and returns that are able to handle the proper load from the system. I can also understand that system size is also very important.

    My son knows more about HVAC than I do! He's only 15 now but he wants to be an HVAC tech when he grows up!

Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678910 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event