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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    12

    Question Rheem vs. Trane vs. Carrier

    Hi;

    We are in the midst of a new construction, single family home, and for our HVAC system we are trying to decide between Rheem, Trane and Carrier.

    The HVAC will be a Split-System (condensor+air handler), 16 Seer or greater, with Two-Stage cooling.

    The big question now is choosing amongst the three manufacturers: Rheem, Trane, and Carrier. What do you recommend and why?

    Thank you for your replies in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Quad-Cities area (midwest).
    Posts
    2,692
    I like all of the mentioned equipment. The most important decision is the ductwork sizing and layout.

    If a contractor shows you his (duct) layout with a zoning option, then you know whom to go with.

    If a contractor is going to have his installers decide how it should be installed, beware.

    Alot of installers work on a T+M basis, so "quality" is a low priority.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Metro Atlanta
    Posts
    777
    The only one on that list I like is Rheem, and is the winner in my opinion.

    I would never install Trane or Carrier on my home, or a family members home.

    One big advantage Rheem has is you can get parts for a Rheem way cheaper than you can get Carrier or Trane.
    The opinions expressed by me are not that of my employer.


    insulation modern marvels
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g37riSkyZzM

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    East Texas
    Posts
    903
    I installed a two stage comfortmaker last year. Solid unit. Made by ICP - carrier

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    winnipeg
    Posts
    1,330
    Quote Originally Posted by Timber View Post
    I installed a two stage comfortmaker last year. Solid unit. Made by ICP - carrier
    yuk'''
    it was working.... played with it.... now its broke.... whats the going hourly rate for HVAC repair

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,158
    Model numbers?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,275
    Rheem uses less proprietary parts in their units. Do you have high energy costs or is there significant rebates for 16 SEER? Or are you looking more for the extra potential comfort from 2 stage? Be aware that most 2 stage installations end up being grossly oversized, and the 2nd stage kicks on rarely if ever. Getting a 15 SEER sided at the "low stage" of a 16 SEER will give you the lowest overall costs in most casts.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by BaldLoonie View Post
    Model numbers?
    Rheem: RARL-JEC Series for the condensors and RHPN-JC Series for the Air Handler

    Trane: XL16i for the Condensors and TAM7 for eth Air Handlers

    Carrier: Infinity 17 Series with the companion Air Handler

    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    Rheem uses less proprietary parts in their units. Do you have high energy costs or is there significant rebates for 16 SEER? Or are you looking more for the extra potential comfort from 2 stage? Be aware that most 2 stage installations end up being grossly oversized, and the 2nd stage kicks on rarely if ever. Getting a 15 SEER sided at the "low stage" of a 16 SEER will give you the lowest overall costs in most casts.
    The primary concnern is efficiency. We have no problem to pay a few dollars extra if it will ultimately pay for itself in a short period of time. Its like an "investment". So yes, a 15 SEER is less expensive for sure, but then in the long run it may cost us more to operate. Also, we had an Engineer prepare, what is called here in state of New York, a Maual J and Manual D report. Basically the engineer will use several factors (house construct, window types, location and etc.) to determine the optimal HVAC requirements (Manual J) and then prepares a Duck-Work layout (Manual D). That is then shared with the HVAC contractors to prepare their bids. So, eventhough I am not certain how good of a job the Engineer has done, I know that everyone is quoting based on the same specifications.

    On ething I have found out is that Rheem is almost 10% cheaper than Trane and Carrier. Carrier is a little more money than Trane, but truly minimal. Though Carrier has a good name, none of my HVAC contractors seem to care for it much. As for Trane, they are not too crazy about either. One of the HVAC contractors, though he is a dealer for all three brands, says Rheem is wisest because, not only it is less expensive, but also becasue, as mentioned by NY2GA01 the parts are readily available and less expensive to repair.

    I guess I am looking for some confidence that Rheem is at least as good as Trane and Carrier.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,275
    The issue of proprietary parts is more than cost. Sometimes it can take 2-3 days to get a part. Without any rebates or other incentives going to 2 stage equipment will not pay for itself in energy savings over it's expected lifetime. You buy 2 stage units for comfort. I'd focus more on how well the equipment is installed and how well the house/ductwork is sealed/insulated if you primary concern is energy bills. Get everything sealed up like it should be and your bills won't be enough to worry about getting an extra SEER or two. In order to get rated SEER you equipment must not be oversized. The Manual J calculations are only as accurate as the person putting in the numbers. Contractors are scared to deviate from 500sqft per ton and will fudge the inputs to get the result they like. There's no reason a well insulated new construction home can't get 1,000sqft per ton.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,158
    I've worked for a Rheem dealer for 20 years. Rheem parts aren't any less proprietary than anyone else. Certainly not any lower priced either. I'd probably lean Trane for lower parts prices.

    You are looking at pretty comparable units. Still a little scared of the TAM7 with its high end controls. Lot of service bulletins since it came out. Since you don't mention size, hard to look up exact figures but look at SEER and EER carefully. Just because those are 16-17 SEER units allegedly, doesn't mean they will get it, especially in bigger sizes. In a hot climate, look at EER for the highest number.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,275
    Watch EER really close. You will find the jump from 11 (builders unit) to 12 or 13 is reasonable in cost and probably worth doing. Going from 12-13 to 14-15 EER will sometimes double the price, not worth it IMHO. EER is efficiency based on 95 degrees outside vs 80 inside, SEER is 82 outside, 80 inside. I don't think 82/80 is realistic for most people in a normal climate. With a 2 degree difference I probably won't even turn on my AC.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    12
    Just wanted to thank you all for your inputs. Very helpful indeed even though I see that there is no clear cut answer.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Greenwood Indiana (Indianapolis)
    Posts
    420
    Buy a Heat Pump. I like Rheem because of their warranties.
    As iron sharpens iron so one man sharpens another Proverbs 27:17 NIV84

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