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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    26

    how to quantify in dollars the differences in efficiency numbers?

    I have 2 options:

    option 1: SEER 15, EER 12.5, HSPF 8.5

    option 2: SEER 16.2, EER 13.5, HSPF 9.0

    is there anyway to translate the efficiency into dollars? does anyone have a ballpark figure?

    thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,145
    How may dollars do you spend in a year for heat/cooling?
    In most cases it makes more sense to use the extra $$$ to seal up the house instead of buying a higher end HVAC unit.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,850
    Quote Originally Posted by jcnycarch View Post
    I have 2 options:

    option 1: SEER 15, EER 12.5, HSPF 8.5

    option 2: SEER 16.2, EER 13.5, HSPF 9.0

    is there anyway to translate the efficiency into dollars? does anyone have a ballpark figure? hank you!
    You can put numbers on the difference; however, "there are far too many other factors that hinder or contribute to those efficiency numbers that their small rating differences become insignificant."

    There are countless ways that the efficiency of heating & cooling a home can be improved whereby the small difference in equipment rating numbers can become relatively irrelevant.

    You have far more than two options that can affect the cooling & heating annual utility costs...it might pay you to explore them...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    How may dollars do you spend in a year for heat/cooling?
    In most cases it makes more sense to use the extra $$$ to seal up the house instead of buying a higher end HVAC unit.
    Generally, I agree with your comment though the price difference is low after all rebates/discounts are applied. That's the reason why the question is purely about efficiency because the cost is not a significant difference but just enough to ask my question...

    Thank you.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by udarrell View Post
    You can put numbers on the difference; however, "there are far too many other factors that hinder or contribute to those efficiency numbers that their small rating differences become insignificant."

    There are countless ways that the efficiency of heating & cooling a home can be improved whereby the small difference in equipment rating numbers can become relatively irrelevant.

    You have far more than two options that can affect the cooling & heating annual utility costs...it might pay you to explore them...
    Yes, you're right. Seal windows, add insulation, etc...Assume all things equal and talk purely about efficiency numbers from the units.

    Doesn't sound like quantifying this is possible?

    Thanks in advance.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,145
    If one is a 2stage and the other is a single stage there may be comfort differences.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    winnipeg
    Posts
    1,330
    not likely
    it was working.... played with it.... now its broke.... whats the going hourly rate for HVAC repair

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,233
    Quote Originally Posted by jcnycarch View Post
    Yes, you're right. Seal windows, add insulation, etc...Assume all things equal and talk purely about efficiency numbers from the units.

    Doesn't sound like quantifying this is possible?
    about 5% less energy cost for higher the SEER & HSPF, all other things being equal, as you have assUmed.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    26
    Thank you!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    149
    A life cycle cost comparison can help you estimate how much will ultimately be POTENTIALLY saved over the life of the equipment (potentially because it is an estimate, depending on variables that might change in real time). In order to figure this, you need the capacity of the units, the full cost including installation, the annual and occasional maintenance fees, your local energy rates and your location's average heating and cooling degree days.

    Quick estimates of savings can be determined just by using the capacity of the equipment, EER, a set amount of hours and local electrical rates.

    For instance, 18 ton units with different EER running 1000 hrs (that's 18,000,000 btuh):

    1.5 ton 13.0 EER unit running 1000 hrs at $.155kWh will cost $215.18
    1.5 ton 15.5 EER unit running 1000 hrs at $.155kWh will cost $179.71
    1.5 ton 20.0 EER unit running 1000 hrs at $.155kWh will cost $139.78

    Your example using the same size units at 1000 hrs:

    1.5 tons 12.5 EER unit running 1000 hrs at .155kWh will cost $224
    1.5 tons 13.5 EER unit running 1000 hrs at .155kWh will cost $207

    A little more than 7% savings in this example, YMMV.

    Keep in mind this example is for a 1.5 ton unit running 1000 hrs.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by vangoghsear View Post
    A life cycle cost comparison can help you estimate how much will ultimately be POTENTIALLY saved over the life of the equipment (potentially because it is an estimate, depending on variables that might change in real time). In order to figure this, you need the capacity of the units, the full cost including installation, the annual and occasional maintenance fees, your local energy rates and your location's average heating and cooling degree days.

    Quick estimates of savings can be determined just by using the capacity of the equipment, EER, a set amount of hours and local electrical rates.

    For instance, 18 ton units with different EER running 1000 hrs (that's 18,000,000 btuh):

    1.5 ton 13.0 EER unit running 1000 hrs at $.155kWh will cost $215.18
    1.5 ton 15.5 EER unit running 1000 hrs at $.155kWh will cost $179.71
    1.5 ton 20.0 EER unit running 1000 hrs at $.155kWh will cost $139.78

    Your example using the same size units at 1000 hrs:

    1.5 tons 12.5 EER unit running 1000 hrs at .155kWh will cost $224
    1.5 tons 13.5 EER unit running 1000 hrs at .155kWh will cost $207

    A little more than 7% savings in this example, YMMV.

    Keep in mind this example is for a 1.5 ton unit running 1000 hrs.
    Wow, impressive. Thank you very much! I knew it would be a small percentage. I'm just looking for added justification to go w/ a higher end unit. I made that decision and I will indeed move forward. Thanks to everyone.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    149
    Your best justification is probably just the fact that the more efficient model is the more environmentally favorable choice.

    Also look into incentives for choosing the higher efficiency model, not sure if there are any right now. It varies by location, sometimes your utility company may even offer something.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,145
    Good luck finding any air cooled equipment over 14 EER w/o breaking the bank. 12 EER equipment is common and affordable, just one line higher than the builder grade in most brands.

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