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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    8
    We are currently looking to place a pellet stove in our basement. Not many options in our area but we were looking into buying a quadra-fire. The basement is not yet finished but the studs are already in place for drywall. One of the pellet stove dealers told us to insulate the basement well and then put the fan on our Gibson furnace to get the hot air up to the second floor. Will this heat the whole house and where is it getting the air to circulate?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,597
    how many btu's will the pellet stove put out?

    what is the heat loss in btu's of your home?


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    8
    The pellet stove has 4 settings, so up to 60,000 BTUS. I have to look up info on the Gibson furnace.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,597
    you won't find the heat loss of your home on your furnace.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    8
    All I have is a model number of Gibson GC313A-036CA. In our specs they were supposed to install a Trane model (96% efficiency) but put a Gibson in its place. I can't find the manuals.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    my oldest Daughter has been using one for ~4y in W Lafayette IN to help --
    be SURE to have source of fresh air to it!
    they just adapted a bsmt window for I/O air.
    watch & get pellets on sale -- sometimes -- but last year was tight market = no sales

    how did someone decide what size HVAC system to install?
    guess?

    did you get a rebate for getting a Gibson instead of a Trane?
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Pottsboro TX
    Posts
    181

    Pellet stove in basement

    Wiley,
    Be very careful with this addition to your home. The operational temperatures on the outside of a pellet stove can reach several hundred degrees at full fire. If it's a stove with a glass viewing door, there is lots of heat transfer via radiation to objects in the room.
    60,000 BTUHs in the basement is an awful lot of heat. If the basement is fully insulated (at least R-13) on the outside walls you would probably be able to move the heat from the stove to the rest of the house by simply adding a large return in the basement. I wouldn't connect the stove directly to the furnace ductwork.
    The stove definitely will need an air supply for burning the pellets. If your house is a "tight" house you don't want to create an oxygen starved living condition for the occupants.
    How are you going to exhaust the stove? The stove produces very high temperature exhaust gases.
    Mount a CO detector near the stove.
    Check with your insurance company about extra cost to
    cover stove installation.
    Keep the fire department number close by.

    [Edited by Pschneid on 10-29-2006 at 12:00 PM]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    8
    The basement is a walkout basement with sliding glass doors and also a large picture window with two openings. So there would be no problem with air. The Gibson furnace is 92.1% efficient but still haven't figured out the BTU number. The Gibson has an air filter and a humidifier included. I don't think the Trane model came with that and that is why it was substituted.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    8
    The pellet stove has 4 settings. The highest would be 60,000 BTU's. The lowest setting is 15,000 BTu's. We have 3 registers in basement now. No returns are presently there.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Appleton
    Posts
    34
    Ya know I bought a pellet stove. While they will save you some money if you have fuel oil or propane, I have found there is little savings if you use natural gas. Maybe a couple hundred bucks a winter if you can get pellets for around 150 a ton, but it is alot of work hauling cleaning and do not forget about the outlaying of 3500 bucks or more for a good stove. The Mount Vernon you are talking about is that and more plus install I bet. Plus then you have another gadget to break.

    Some folks have corn furnaces but they use 3-4 ton of corn and you must clean it. Corn costs are up this year.




  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    8
    The cost is about 3000 without the pipe or installation. It can burn corn or wood pellets. The cost of corn is about $170 a ton vs. $230 a ton for wood pellets. However, I hate when people brag about paying $500 a year to heat a home!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    8
    To reply to an earlier response the current gas furnace is 60,000 BTU's. How will I get the heat up to the next 2 floors? One of the pellet stove dealers talked about using a small computer fan? Is he talking about the furnace or a return?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    468
    A "computer fan" (4" muffin fan) mounted high in a doorway can help to move a bit of warm air from a room with a stove to the next room. That's about all one can expect from one.

    Getting 15-60k Btuh out of your basement up into the rst of the house will be a bit of a challenge, depending on your ductwork and floor plan.

    I envision the following problems with making a basement stove heat the rest of a house economically when all is said and done:

    1) Hot basement loses more heat via conduction through walls and windows.

    2)With some kind of return rigged near stove and blowing elsewhere there is potential of discomfort from "cold blow" as well as coordination issue with regular returns.

    3)Cheaper heat offset by increased electricity use running blower 24/7 to distribute basement air heated by stove

    4) All the other objections raised by earlier posters.

    I heated with wood when I lived in Penna, and my sister has a supplemental coal stove in her Philly warehouse loft. Both work well but location central to living area is crucial to effectiveness.

    Unless you have some way of opening up the basement floor, say by installing a good size open grating above the stove such that it naturally convects up into the above living space, I don't think a basement install will be feasible or effective.

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