Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 27

Thread: Soot vacs?

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    235
    Post Likes

    Soot vacs?

    Hey guys I was going to post this in the oil section but figured it is a tool in a sense so why not post it here, Im sure ill get a better answer here then in the oil section lol. Anyway Im getting into a busy time for me. I do alot of oil side work and I was thinking it might be a good idea to get a quality vacuum and something that wont break my bank while doing the side work. I have a cheap shop vac that I use here and there but I hate the thought of having an issue with it when at a customers home. At my house its one thing but somebodys elses would be real bad to me.

    I did a look around and some of the soot vacs that I found are close to 500 or so. So I kept searching and it seems a few that I found are some that look like there for fireplaces and I was wondering would they work good for cleaning a boiler or warm air furnace?

    Heres a few that I found:

    http://www.amazon.com/PowerSmith-PAV...ds=soot+vacuum

    http://www.amazon.com/Austin-Baccus-...ds=soot+vacuum

    http://www.amazon.com/5-8-Gallon-Ash...ds=soot+vacuum

    http://www.northlineexpress.com/fire...acuum-400.html

    http://www.homedepot.com/Appliances-...&storeId=10051

    http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...&storeId=10051

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    4,348
    Post Likes
    I don't see how you have been getting away with a cheap shop vac. But apparently you see the need for a better vacuum. So why would you go with another cheap vacuum. Buy a Sootmaster and be done with it.

    I couldn't even imagine doing oil work again, without one.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    New Ulm, MN
    Posts
    37
    Post Likes
    I just got done with a dandy of a Sooted up boiler. Only had to dump my vacuum and bang the soot off the filter of my 40 dollar shop-vac 3 times but the entire soot removal took me about 5 hours. Just wondering if this high quality soot master vacuum is worth it. Like what does it do better than a cheap vac like I have been using? I'm all for making these nightmare calls easier. Our small shop gets a plugged hx about every other week in the heating season.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lake Ronkonkoma, New York
    Posts
    710
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by ascj View Post
    I don't see how you have been getting away with a cheap shop vac. But apparently you see the need for a better vacuum. So why would you go with another cheap vacuum. Buy a Sootmaster and be done with it.

    I couldn't even imagine doing oil work again, without one.
    I would be afraid of soot damaging a house with a shop vac. Sootmaster is a good deal. You only buy one during your career. The motor is easily replaced if needed.
    If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Coastal Maine
    Posts
    954
    Post Likes
    wicat, We have been buying them from Sid Harvey's. Theirs are a rebranded SootMasters without the cost. I think that you have Sid's in CT don't you? The difference in buying from someone like Sid's and buying it online is getting some help with warranty issues and replacement parts.

    Good Luck

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    235
    Post Likes
    i see sid harveys has them I just havent priced them out. My problem is I dont know if I can justify paying something like 500 bucks for a vacuum that I wont use all the time. I have been able to get away because most of the time when I was doing the side work I was working for an oil company and had everything on my truck. I dont work for a company like that anymore so to get a soot vac I would have to buy one. My house was pretty clean when I service it so my shop vac does a decent job at picking it up but thats just my house.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Central NJ Area
    Posts
    970
    Post Likes
    If you really have to use the shop vac can't you vent the exhaust from the vac to the outdoors? I've seen someone stick a shop vac into a pile of nice fluffy dark soot and it just shot out of the shop vac lol! The house had a fine layer of black dust every where. I felt bad but it was pretty funny.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Broomall, PA
    Posts
    557
    Post Likes
    More importantly, why is your hex plugging so frequently, if at all? Sounds like a severe lack of combustible air. I've seen this in auto body shops & woodworking shops--places with lots of dust/powerful dust collection.
    What kind of heater/burner? You may need to get a combustion air intake kit to bring in fresh air for combustion. And get the heating unit properly tuned.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Springville, NY
    Posts
    4,776
    Post Likes
    I use a Ridgid vac, the 5 gallon version. I bought my original vac 13 years ago and have thousands of oil cleanings go through it. I've only replaced filters and the hoses. I did so man C&Ts that the narrow plastic end of the hose wore down to the wide end. It's noisy but the muffler attachment works pretty well.

    Anyone know where to get a soot snake? The one I had a long time ago was flexible corrugated steel about 4 feet or so long. One end fit inside the shop vac hose. I think it may have been a Sid Harvey brand?
    Experience - knowing when to get the hell out of the way and plug your ears.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
    Posts
    2,512
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    I use a Ridgid vac, the 5 gallon version. I bought my original vac 13 years ago and have thousands of oil cleanings go through it. I've only replaced filters and the hoses. I did so man C&Ts that the narrow plastic end of the hose wore down to the wide end. It's noisy but the muffler attachment works pretty well.

    Anyone know where to get a soot snake? The one I had a long time ago was flexible corrugated steel about 4 feet or so long. One end fit inside the shop vac hose. I think it may have been a Sid Harvey brand?
    yes, I know I'm a little late to the party!

    Sid Harvey's S53-40


    Flexible vacuum hose. 4’ long, 7/8” diameter.
    FEATURES:

    Reaches places impossible to access with regular vacuum hoses.

    Particularly useful for today’s smaller, more compact boilers.

    Easy slip-on attachment to any standard vacuum.

    Flexible without being overly “floppy”.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Springville, NY
    Posts
    4,776
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by darctangent View Post
    yes, I know I'm a little late to the party!

    Sid Harvey's S53-40


    Flexible vacuum hose. 4’ long, 7/8” diameter.
    FEATURES:

    Reaches places impossible to access with regular vacuum hoses.

    Particularly useful for today’s smaller, more compact boilers.

    Easy slip-on attachment to any standard vacuum.

    Flexible without being overly “floppy”.
    Thanks, bud. I just picked one up from controls central
    Experience - knowing when to get the hell out of the way and plug your ears.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
    Posts
    2,512
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by HVAC_Marc View Post
    Thanks, bud. I just picked one up from controls central
    It was just my dumb luck that I came across the catalog listing at the same time I was reading this thread. Too good of a fit not to post. Happy vacuuming!
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    772
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by wicat3 View Post
    Hey guys I was going to post this in the oil section but figured it is a tool in a sense so why not post it here, Im sure ill get a better answer here then in the oil section lol. Anyway Im getting into a busy time for me. I do alot of oil side work and I was thinking it might be a good idea to get a quality vacuum and something that wont break my bank while doing the side work. I have a cheap shop vac that I use here and there but I hate the thought of having an issue with it when at a customers home. At my house its one thing but somebodys elses would be real bad to me.

    I did a look around and some of the soot vacs that I found are close to 500 or so. So I kept searching and it seems a few that I found are some that look like there for fireplaces and I was wondering would they work good for cleaning a boiler or warm air furnace?
    You might want to check out the Koblenz AG-1200.

    It's a bagless vacuum that traps all the dust and dirt in a water tank which you then just pour out the mud.
    Might work just as well on soot.

    Maybe more than you want to pay at around $400, but water filtration vacuums are as close to 100% effective


    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
    JUST A LITTLE CLOSER AND THE LITTER BOX IS ALL MINE!

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor MagazineThe place where Electrical professionals meet.
Quality Home Comfort Awards